Teaching reading to disabled readers with language disorders: A controlled evaluation of synthetic speech feedback

Teaching reading to disabled readers with language disorders: A controlled evaluation of... In a long‐term study two groups of language and reading impaired students (N= 15 + 15) were reading with the aid of segmented speech‐feedback in a computerized program. One group received feedback that was simultaneously segmented visually and auditorily into syllables, the other received feedback by letter names. In both groups subjects were expected to synthesize segments into words and to compare their synthesis to whole word feed‐back subsequently provided by the computer. They worked for half a lesson (approximately 20 minutes) a day for a total of 40 days. During this period, the experiment groups progressed more in reading than a control group of age and reading‐level‐matched students (N= 35) who received traditional remedial instruction. The group in the syllable condition gained slightly more in non‐word reading and in syllable segmentation than did the letter group. Differences in gains in reading abilities were not explained by differences in age, but to some extent by initial level of phoneme and syllable awareness. Future applications of the speech‐feedback system are discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Psychology Wiley

Teaching reading to disabled readers with language disorders: A controlled evaluation of synthetic speech feedback

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0036-5564
eISSN
1467-9450
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1467-9450.1996.tb00647.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In a long‐term study two groups of language and reading impaired students (N= 15 + 15) were reading with the aid of segmented speech‐feedback in a computerized program. One group received feedback that was simultaneously segmented visually and auditorily into syllables, the other received feedback by letter names. In both groups subjects were expected to synthesize segments into words and to compare their synthesis to whole word feed‐back subsequently provided by the computer. They worked for half a lesson (approximately 20 minutes) a day for a total of 40 days. During this period, the experiment groups progressed more in reading than a control group of age and reading‐level‐matched students (N= 35) who received traditional remedial instruction. The group in the syllable condition gained slightly more in non‐word reading and in syllable segmentation than did the letter group. Differences in gains in reading abilities were not explained by differences in age, but to some extent by initial level of phoneme and syllable awareness. Future applications of the speech‐feedback system are discussed.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1996

References

  • Effects of independent word practice with segmented and whole‐word sound feedback in disabled readers
    Daal, Daal; Reitsma, Reitsma
  • The use of speech in computer‐assisted‐learning programs for beginning readers
    Davidson, Davidson
  • Phonological recoding and reading acquisition
    Jorm, Jorm; Share, Share
  • Phonological processing skills and deficits in adult dyslexics
    Pennington, Pennington; Van Orden, Van Orden; Smith, Smith; Green, Green; Haith, Haith
  • Continuity between childhood dyslexia and adult reading
    Scarborough, Scarborough

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