Teaching children about good health? Halo effects in child‐directed advertisements for unhealthy food

Teaching children about good health? Halo effects in child‐directed advertisements for... IntroductionAn increasing body of research has documented the vast amount of marketing for nutritionally poor food and drinks aimed at children and its harmful impact on their diets and health. Therefore, public health experts propose regulations to limit unhealthy food marketing to children, also citing limitations of existing industry self‐regulatory program. In addition to advertising healthy food to children, experts also call on the food industry to promote nutrition and physical activity messages in food advertising to children as a potential solution. In response, the U.S. Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) food industry self‐regulatory program identifies ‘healthy lifestyle messaging’ that promotes physical activity and/or good dietary habits to children as a program goal. In an assessment of food marketing to children, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission reported numerous company actions to encourage healthy eating and lifestyle choices by children and teens, such as partnerships with local youth‐oriented organizations, school‐based programs for nutrition education, depicting brand spokes‐characters engaged in physical activity and supporting athletic events and programs. The World Health Organization also recommends that Member States develop policies to reduce the negative impact of marketing foods high in sugar, fats or salt on children by reducing children's exposure http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Teaching children about good health? Halo effects in child‐directed advertisements for unhealthy food

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12257
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionAn increasing body of research has documented the vast amount of marketing for nutritionally poor food and drinks aimed at children and its harmful impact on their diets and health. Therefore, public health experts propose regulations to limit unhealthy food marketing to children, also citing limitations of existing industry self‐regulatory program. In addition to advertising healthy food to children, experts also call on the food industry to promote nutrition and physical activity messages in food advertising to children as a potential solution. In response, the U.S. Children's Food and Beverage Advertising Initiative (CFBAI) food industry self‐regulatory program identifies ‘healthy lifestyle messaging’ that promotes physical activity and/or good dietary habits to children as a program goal. In an assessment of food marketing to children, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission reported numerous company actions to encourage healthy eating and lifestyle choices by children and teens, such as partnerships with local youth‐oriented organizations, school‐based programs for nutrition education, depicting brand spokes‐characters engaged in physical activity and supporting athletic events and programs. The World Health Organization also recommends that Member States develop policies to reduce the negative impact of marketing foods high in sugar, fats or salt on children by reducing children's exposure

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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