Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin‐converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells

Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin‐converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide... A diversity of pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system have been reported for Camellia sinensis: antioxidative, antiproliferative and anti‐angiogenic activity, and nitric oxide synthase activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the connection between tea and angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects of tea on the cardiovascular system. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with extracts of Japanese Sencha (green tea), Indian Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (black tea) and Rooibos tea, respectively. The main flavanols and purine alkaloids in green and black tea were examined for their effects on ACE and NO. After incubation with green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea for 10 min, a significant and dose‐dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen with the green tea and the black tea. No significant effect on ACE was seen with the Rooibos tea. After 10‐min incubation with (–)‐epicatechin, (–)‐epigallocatechin, (–)‐epicatechingallate and (–)‐ epigallocatechingallate, a dose‐dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen for all four tea catechins. After 24‐h incubation, a significantly increased dose‐dependent effect on NO production in HUVEC was seen for the green tea, the black tea and the Rooibos tea. After 24‐h incubation with (–)‐epicatechin, (–)‐epigallocatechin, (–)‐epicatechingallate and (–)‐epigallocatechingallate, a dose‐dependent increased NO production in HUVEC was seen. In conclusion, tea extracts from C. sinensis may have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular disease. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology: An International Journal of Pharmaceutical Science Wiley

Tea flavanols inhibit angiotensin‐converting enzyme activity and increase nitric oxide production in human endothelial cells

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2006 Royal Pharmaceutical Society of Great Britain
ISSN
0022-3573
eISSN
2042-7158
D.O.I.
10.1211/jpp.58.8.0016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A diversity of pharmacological effects on the cardiovascular system have been reported for Camellia sinensis: antioxidative, antiproliferative and anti‐angiogenic activity, and nitric oxide synthase activation. The purpose of this study was to investigate if the connection between tea and angiotensin‐converting enzyme (ACE) and nitric oxide (NO) might be an explanation of the pharmacological effects of tea on the cardiovascular system. Cultured endothelial cells from human umbilical veins (HUVEC) were incubated with extracts of Japanese Sencha (green tea), Indian Assam Broken Orange Pekoe (black tea) and Rooibos tea, respectively. The main flavanols and purine alkaloids in green and black tea were examined for their effects on ACE and NO. After incubation with green tea, black tea and Rooibos tea for 10 min, a significant and dose‐dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen with the green tea and the black tea. No significant effect on ACE was seen with the Rooibos tea. After 10‐min incubation with (–)‐epicatechin, (–)‐epigallocatechin, (–)‐epicatechingallate and (–)‐ epigallocatechingallate, a dose‐dependent inhibition of ACE activity in HUVEC was seen for all four tea catechins. After 24‐h incubation, a significantly increased dose‐dependent effect on NO production in HUVEC was seen for the green tea, the black tea and the Rooibos tea. After 24‐h incubation with (–)‐epicatechin, (–)‐epigallocatechin, (–)‐epicatechingallate and (–)‐epigallocatechingallate, a dose‐dependent increased NO production in HUVEC was seen. In conclusion, tea extracts from C. sinensis may have the potential to prevent and protect against cardiovascular disease.

Journal

Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology: An International Journal of Pharmaceutical ScienceWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2006

References

  • Green tea polyphenols inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation stimulated by native low‐density lipoprotein
    Locher, Locher; Emmanuele, Emmanuele; Suter, Suter; Vetter, Vetter; Barton, Barton
  • Antiangiogenic properties of natural polyphenols from red wine and green tea
    Oak, Oak; Bedoui, Bedoui; Schini‐Kerth, Schini‐Kerth
  • Nitric oxide modulates captopril‐mediated angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibition in porcine iliac arteries
    Persson, Persson; Andersson, Andersson
  • Nitric oxide donors and angiotensin‐converting enzyme inhibitors act in concert to inhibit human angiotensin‐converting enzyme activity and platelet aggregation in vitro
    Persson, Persson; Whiss, Whiss; Nyhlén, Nyhlén; Jacobsson‐Strier, Jacobsson‐Strier; Glindell, Glindell; Andersson, Andersson

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