Synthesis and release of neuroactive substances by glial cells

Synthesis and release of neuroactive substances by glial cells Glia contain, synthesize, or release more than 20 neuroactive compounds including neuropeptides, amino acid transmitters, eicosanoids, steroids, and growth factors. The stimuli that elicit release differ among compounds but include neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, receptor agonists, and elevated external (K+). The mechanisms of release are poorly understood in most cases. Many of the neuroactive compounds are localized in discrete subpopulations of glia. Thus, glia are equipped to send as well as receive chemical messages and appear to be present as classes of cells with differing abilities to communicate chemically. It is possible that glia are as diverse as neurons in their functional characteristics. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Glia Wiley

Synthesis and release of neuroactive substances by glial cells

Glia, Volume 5 (2) – Jan 1, 1992

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
0894-1491
eISSN
1098-1136
DOI
10.1002/glia.440050202
pmid
1349588
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Glia contain, synthesize, or release more than 20 neuroactive compounds including neuropeptides, amino acid transmitters, eicosanoids, steroids, and growth factors. The stimuli that elicit release differ among compounds but include neuropeptides, neurotransmitters, receptor agonists, and elevated external (K+). The mechanisms of release are poorly understood in most cases. Many of the neuroactive compounds are localized in discrete subpopulations of glia. Thus, glia are equipped to send as well as receive chemical messages and appear to be present as classes of cells with differing abilities to communicate chemically. It is possible that glia are as diverse as neurons in their functional characteristics.

Journal

GliaWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1992

References

  • A novel chloride‐dependent L‐( 3 H)glutamate binding site in astrocyte membranes
    Bridges, Bridges; Nieto‐Sampedro, Nieto‐Sampedro; Kadri, Kadri; Cotman, Cotman
  • Constitutive and regulated secretion of proteins
    Burgess, Burgess; Kelly, Kelly
  • Cellular origins of cyclic GMP responses to excitatory amino acid receptor agonists in rat cerebellum
    Garthwaite, Garthwaite; Garthwaite, Garthwaite
  • Regional differences in 5‐hydroxytryptamine and catecholamine uptake in primary astrocyte cultures
    Kimelberg, Kimelberg; Katz, Katz
  • Swelling of astrocytes causes membrane potential depolarization
    Kimelberg, Kimelberg; O'Connor, O'Connor
  • Angiotensinogen gene expression in neuronal and glial cells in primary cultures of rat brain
    Kumar, Kumar; Rassoli, Rassoli; Raizada, Raizada
  • Adenosine stimulates cAMP‐mediated taurine release from LRM55 glial cells
    Madelian, Madelian; Silliman, Silliman; Shain, Shain
  • Spontaneous‐ and beta‐adrenergic receptor‐mediated taurine release from astroglial cells do not require extracellular calcium
    Martin, Martin; Madelian, Madelian; Shain, Shain
  • Human chromogranin A‐like immunoreactivity in the Bergmann glia of the rat brain
    McAuliffe, McAuliffe; Hess, Hess
  • Evidence for an astrocyte‐derived vasorelaxing factor with properties similar to nitric oxide
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  • Volume regulation in astrocytes: A role for taurine as an osmoeffector
    Pasantes‐Morales, Pasantes‐Morales; Schousboe, Schousboe
  • ATP‐evoked Ca 2+ mobilisation and prostanoid release from astrocytes: P 2 ‐purinergic receptors linked to phosphoinositide hydrolysis
    Pearce, Pearce; Murphy, Murphy; Jeremy, Jeremy; Morrow, Morrow; Dandona, Dandona
  • Dose‐dependent, K + ‐stimulated efflux of endogenous taurine from primary astrocytes cultures is Ca 2+ ‐dependent
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  • Neuron/glia relationships observed over intervals of several months in living mice
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  • Beta‐adrenergic stimulation decreases glial and increases neural contact with the basal lamina in rat neurointermediate lobes incubated in vitro
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    Solis, Solis; Herranz, Herranz; Herreras, Herreras; Menendez, Menendez; Martin Del Rio, Martin Del Rio
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    Waniewski, Waniewski; Martin, Martin; Shain, Shain

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