Sweetened beverage intake in association to energy and sugar consumption and cardiometabolic markers in children

Sweetened beverage intake in association to energy and sugar consumption and cardiometabolic... AbbreviationsSSBssugar‐sweetened beveragesASBsartificially sweetened beveragesNDNSNational Diet and Nutrition SurveyBMIbody mass indexTEtotal energyOLSordinary least squaresIntroductionSugar‐sweetened beverages (SSBs) are major contributors of sugar and energy intake, providing 39% of total sugar intake in the US population . Sugar intake is especially high in children and adolescents . Data from observational studies and clinical trials have shown a causal association between SSB consumption and obesity and diabetes . There are also indications that SSBs are related to metabolic syndrome and hypertension . Thus, current guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend that daily sugar intake should ideally not exceed 5% of the total energy intake . In order to achieve this goal, public health policies promoting SSB reduction have been growing. In response, the beverage industry has increasingly marketed artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) , while ASBs have also been suggested as SSB alternatives by clinical guidelines and national campaigns focusing on children . As a result, ASB sales have been increasing over the last years in many countries, exceeding these of SSBs in the USA .The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans state that the long‐term effectiveness of low‐calorie sweeteners in weight management is still in question . Trials in children have suggested http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Sweetened beverage intake in association to energy and sugar consumption and cardiometabolic markers in children

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12194
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsSSBssugar‐sweetened beveragesASBsartificially sweetened beveragesNDNSNational Diet and Nutrition SurveyBMIbody mass indexTEtotal energyOLSordinary least squaresIntroductionSugar‐sweetened beverages (SSBs) are major contributors of sugar and energy intake, providing 39% of total sugar intake in the US population . Sugar intake is especially high in children and adolescents . Data from observational studies and clinical trials have shown a causal association between SSB consumption and obesity and diabetes . There are also indications that SSBs are related to metabolic syndrome and hypertension . Thus, current guidelines from the World Health Organization (WHO) recommend that daily sugar intake should ideally not exceed 5% of the total energy intake . In order to achieve this goal, public health policies promoting SSB reduction have been growing. In response, the beverage industry has increasingly marketed artificially sweetened beverages (ASBs) , while ASBs have also been suggested as SSB alternatives by clinical guidelines and national campaigns focusing on children . As a result, ASB sales have been increasing over the last years in many countries, exceeding these of SSBs in the USA .The 2015–2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans state that the long‐term effectiveness of low‐calorie sweeteners in weight management is still in question . Trials in children have suggested

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

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