Susceptibility of partially desalivated rats to erosive tooth wear by calcium‐supplemented beverages

Susceptibility of partially desalivated rats to erosive tooth wear by calcium‐supplemented... INTRODUCTIONErosive tooth wear (ETW) is a prevalent condition, affecting all age groups (Jaeggi & Lussi, ; Salas, Nascimento, Huysmans, & Demarco, ). Patients with particular risk for ETW are those with high consumption of acidic beverages, eating disorders and gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease (Holbrook, Furuholm, Gudmundsson, Theodors, & Meurman, ; Jarvinen, Rytomaa, & Heinonen, ; Schlueter, Jaeggi, & Lussi, ; Schlueter & Tveit, ). Calcium‐modified acidic drinks present lower erosive potential (Attin, Weiss, Becker, Buchalla, & Wiegand, ; Davis, Marshall, Qian, Warren, & Wefel, ; Larsen & Nyvad, ; Scaramucci, Sobral, Eckert, Zero, & Hara, ; Scaramucci et al., ) and constitute a suitable approach for the prevention of extrinsic ETW. Calcium compounds increase the saturation level of acidic drinks in relation to the tooth structure, preventing further dissolution (Featherstone & Lussi, ).In the process of ETW development, salivary flow has been described as the single most important biological modifying factor. Reduced salivary flow rates (hyposalivation) can have a negative impact on acid clearance, buffering and neutralization (Hara & Zero, ). It is also responsible for a reduction in minerals available to interact with the tooth surfaces, favouring demineralization over remineralization (Magalhaes, Wiegand, Rios, Honorio, & Buzalaf, ; Piangprach, Hengtrakool, Kukiattrakoon, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Oral Diseases Wiley

Susceptibility of partially desalivated rats to erosive tooth wear by calcium‐supplemented beverages

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley &Sons Ltd
ISSN
1354-523X
eISSN
1601-0825
D.O.I.
10.1111/odi.12740
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONErosive tooth wear (ETW) is a prevalent condition, affecting all age groups (Jaeggi & Lussi, ; Salas, Nascimento, Huysmans, & Demarco, ). Patients with particular risk for ETW are those with high consumption of acidic beverages, eating disorders and gastro‐oesophageal reflux disease (Holbrook, Furuholm, Gudmundsson, Theodors, & Meurman, ; Jarvinen, Rytomaa, & Heinonen, ; Schlueter, Jaeggi, & Lussi, ; Schlueter & Tveit, ). Calcium‐modified acidic drinks present lower erosive potential (Attin, Weiss, Becker, Buchalla, & Wiegand, ; Davis, Marshall, Qian, Warren, & Wefel, ; Larsen & Nyvad, ; Scaramucci, Sobral, Eckert, Zero, & Hara, ; Scaramucci et al., ) and constitute a suitable approach for the prevention of extrinsic ETW. Calcium compounds increase the saturation level of acidic drinks in relation to the tooth structure, preventing further dissolution (Featherstone & Lussi, ).In the process of ETW development, salivary flow has been described as the single most important biological modifying factor. Reduced salivary flow rates (hyposalivation) can have a negative impact on acid clearance, buffering and neutralization (Hara & Zero, ). It is also responsible for a reduction in minerals available to interact with the tooth surfaces, favouring demineralization over remineralization (Magalhaes, Wiegand, Rios, Honorio, & Buzalaf, ; Piangprach, Hengtrakool, Kukiattrakoon,

Journal

Oral DiseasesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ;

References

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