Survival without Dispersers: Seedling Recruitment under Parents

Survival without Dispersers: Seedling Recruitment under Parents Introduction The loss of tropical forest is a central conservation issue, and much effort has been invested in understanding the extent of forest conversion, the factors contributing to its loss, and possible solutions to decrease the rate of destruction. Human activities in forests are not limited to the cutting of trees, however, subsistence and commercial hunting have affected large tracks of forest but have left their physical structure relatively unaltered (Redford 1992). For example, subsistence hunting by 230 inhabitants of three Waorani villages in Ecuador kills an estimated 3165 mammals, birds, and reptiles annually (Yost & Kelley 1983). Unfortunately, there is little understanding of h o w these hunting activities alter the processes governing the maintenance and long-term sustainability of forest ecosystems. For example, large animals are the preferred species for hunters, and it may be that these species play particularly significant roles in the dispersal of large, seeded tropical trees (Terborgh 1988; Wrangham et al. 1994). Wrangham et al. ( 1 9 9 4 ) demonstrated that, although chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) constitute only 1.4% of the primate frugivore populations and 14.2% of the primate frugivore biomass, they are responsible for an estimated 45.3% of the seeds defecated http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Survival without Dispersers: Seedling Recruitment under Parents

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/survival-without-dispersers-seedling-recruitment-under-parents-242btNhZ4h
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
D.O.I.
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1995.09030675.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction The loss of tropical forest is a central conservation issue, and much effort has been invested in understanding the extent of forest conversion, the factors contributing to its loss, and possible solutions to decrease the rate of destruction. Human activities in forests are not limited to the cutting of trees, however, subsistence and commercial hunting have affected large tracks of forest but have left their physical structure relatively unaltered (Redford 1992). For example, subsistence hunting by 230 inhabitants of three Waorani villages in Ecuador kills an estimated 3165 mammals, birds, and reptiles annually (Yost & Kelley 1983). Unfortunately, there is little understanding of h o w these hunting activities alter the processes governing the maintenance and long-term sustainability of forest ecosystems. For example, large animals are the preferred species for hunters, and it may be that these species play particularly significant roles in the dispersal of large, seeded tropical trees (Terborgh 1988; Wrangham et al. 1994). Wrangham et al. ( 1 9 9 4 ) demonstrated that, although chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) constitute only 1.4% of the primate frugivore populations and 14.2% of the primate frugivore biomass, they are responsible for an estimated 45.3% of the seeds defecated

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1995

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off