Sugar intake by type (added vs. naturally occurring) and physical form (liquid vs. solid) and its varying association with children's body weight, NHANES 2009–2014

Sugar intake by type (added vs. naturally occurring) and physical form (liquid vs. solid) and its... AbbreviationsASAdded sugarsBMIzbody mass index z‐scoreFNDDSFood and Nutrient Database for Dietary StudiesFPEDFoods Patterns Equivalent DatabaseHFCShigh fructose corn syrupNHANESNational Health and Nutrition Examination SurveyNCHSNational Center for Health StatisticsNOSnaturally occurring sugarsSSBssugar‐sweetened beveragesTE=total energyWHOWorld Health OrganizationIntroductionDietary sugars and their various sources are associated with a wide range of health outcomes, some positive and others negative, which can be a source of confusion for the consumer. U.S. Dietary Guidelines discourage the consumption of sugar‐sweetened beverages (SSBs), which tend to be high in glucose and fructose (most commonly in the form of high fructose corn syrup), and have been linked to excess energy intake, obesity and heart disease risk. At the same time, the consumption of whole fruits, many of which are also high in glucose and fructose, is encouraged for their fibre, vitamins and minerals. Limits on consuming these same fruits in beverage form are advised given that fruit juices lack much, if not all, of whole fruit's beneficial fibre. On the other hand, lactose‐containing dairy beverages (i.e. milk) are encouraged given the important nutrients, particularly calcium, they contain.Commonly consumed sugars include the monosaccharides: fructose, glucose and galactose and the disaccharides: sucrose (fructose + glucose), lactose (glucose + galactose) and maltose (glucose + glucose). Disaccharides are quickly broken down during http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Obesity Wiley

Sugar intake by type (added vs. naturally occurring) and physical form (liquid vs. solid) and its varying association with children's body weight, NHANES 2009–2014

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 World Obesity Federation
ISSN
2047-6302
eISSN
2047-6310
D.O.I.
10.1111/ijpo.12264
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

AbbreviationsASAdded sugarsBMIzbody mass index z‐scoreFNDDSFood and Nutrient Database for Dietary StudiesFPEDFoods Patterns Equivalent DatabaseHFCShigh fructose corn syrupNHANESNational Health and Nutrition Examination SurveyNCHSNational Center for Health StatisticsNOSnaturally occurring sugarsSSBssugar‐sweetened beveragesTE=total energyWHOWorld Health OrganizationIntroductionDietary sugars and their various sources are associated with a wide range of health outcomes, some positive and others negative, which can be a source of confusion for the consumer. U.S. Dietary Guidelines discourage the consumption of sugar‐sweetened beverages (SSBs), which tend to be high in glucose and fructose (most commonly in the form of high fructose corn syrup), and have been linked to excess energy intake, obesity and heart disease risk. At the same time, the consumption of whole fruits, many of which are also high in glucose and fructose, is encouraged for their fibre, vitamins and minerals. Limits on consuming these same fruits in beverage form are advised given that fruit juices lack much, if not all, of whole fruit's beneficial fibre. On the other hand, lactose‐containing dairy beverages (i.e. milk) are encouraged given the important nutrients, particularly calcium, they contain.Commonly consumed sugars include the monosaccharides: fructose, glucose and galactose and the disaccharides: sucrose (fructose + glucose), lactose (glucose + galactose) and maltose (glucose + glucose). Disaccharides are quickly broken down during

Journal

Pediatric ObesityWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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