Sublethal toxic effects of cyanobacteria and nonylphenol on environmental sex determination and development in Daphnia

Sublethal toxic effects of cyanobacteria and nonylphenol on environmental sex determination and... In many cladoceran zooplankton, females divide their reproductive effort among females, males, and resting eggs depending on a suite of environmental conditions. Having alternative life‐history strategies allows cladocerans such as Daphnia to achieve high reproductive rates asexually when conditions are favorable and to produce offspring sexually for survival when the environment becomes unsuitable. Because of their rapid reproduction, Daphnia and other cladocerans are useful model organisms in aquatic toxicology. Bioassays using Daphnia serve two functions, to estimate the ecosystem level risk posed by specific chemicals and to quickly detect contaminated waters. Bioassays examine effects in terms of life history features such as growth, survival, and asexual fecundity. We studied the effects of toxic stress on Daphnia galeata mendotae grown under conditions in which it produces female, male, and ephippial offspring. Fecundities in terms of the three types of offspring showed different sensitivities to chemical stress. The stressors were a toxic strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and nonylphenol, a plasticizer, which is a surfactant that interferes with endocrine function in vertebrates. Production of resting eggs and female offspring were affected in both experiments, but the experiments showed different dose responses. Production of males was less sensitive. Exposure to nonylphenol also produced a characteristic developmental abnormality at environmentally relevant concentrations. Life table analysis showed that stress during the sexual phase of the life cycle of Daphnia reduces short‐term population growth and as well as affecting the stock of dormant individuals. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Toxicology & Chemistry Wiley

Sublethal toxic effects of cyanobacteria and nonylphenol on environmental sex determination and development in Daphnia

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 SETAC
ISSN
0730-7268
eISSN
1552-8618
DOI
10.1002/etc.5620160624
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In many cladoceran zooplankton, females divide their reproductive effort among females, males, and resting eggs depending on a suite of environmental conditions. Having alternative life‐history strategies allows cladocerans such as Daphnia to achieve high reproductive rates asexually when conditions are favorable and to produce offspring sexually for survival when the environment becomes unsuitable. Because of their rapid reproduction, Daphnia and other cladocerans are useful model organisms in aquatic toxicology. Bioassays using Daphnia serve two functions, to estimate the ecosystem level risk posed by specific chemicals and to quickly detect contaminated waters. Bioassays examine effects in terms of life history features such as growth, survival, and asexual fecundity. We studied the effects of toxic stress on Daphnia galeata mendotae grown under conditions in which it produces female, male, and ephippial offspring. Fecundities in terms of the three types of offspring showed different sensitivities to chemical stress. The stressors were a toxic strain of the cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa and nonylphenol, a plasticizer, which is a surfactant that interferes with endocrine function in vertebrates. Production of resting eggs and female offspring were affected in both experiments, but the experiments showed different dose responses. Production of males was less sensitive. Exposure to nonylphenol also produced a characteristic developmental abnormality at environmentally relevant concentrations. Life table analysis showed that stress during the sexual phase of the life cycle of Daphnia reduces short‐term population growth and as well as affecting the stock of dormant individuals.

Journal

Environmental Toxicology & ChemistryWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1997

References

  • Comparative toxicant sensitivity of sexual and asexual reproduction in the rotifer Brachionus calyciflorus
    Snell, Snell; Carmona, Carmona
  • Concentrations of alkylphenols in rivers and estuaries in England and Wales
    Blackburn, Blackburn; Waldock, Waldock
  • Clonal variation in the survival and reproduction of Daphnia pulicaria under low‐food stress
    Epp, Epp
  • The ecological role of chemical stimuli for the zooplankton: Predator‐induced morphology in Daphnia
    Dodson, Dodson
  • Physiological and biochemical perturbations in Daphnia magna following exposure to the model environmental estrogen diethylstilbestrol
    Baldwin, Baldwin; Milam, Milam; LeBlanc, LeBlanc

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