Study of spatial components of forest cover using partial Mantel tests and path analysis

Study of spatial components of forest cover using partial Mantel tests and path analysis Abstract. Plant species distributions are generally thought to be chiefly under environmental control, although they may be affected by disturbance events or dispersion properties of the species. The relative importance of these different factors is not easy to evaluate because they often share common spatial patterns, such that an inextricable network of relationships occurs between plant distributions, environmental conditions, disturbance events and endogenous factors such as propagule dispersion. In this paper we propose a method for untangling the common spatial component from the relationship between environmental conditions and the distribution of tree species. Using partial Mantel tests and path analysis, we test models of relationships between these data sets. Results show that in our study area, spatial patterns of species associated with hydric conditions remain largely correlated with environmental conditions. However, mesic sites show more complex forest covers, in which a significant spatial component persists when environmental variation is statistically controlled for. This remaining spatial variability suggests that other factors possessing spatial structure partly explain species distributions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Study of spatial components of forest cover using partial Mantel tests and path analysis

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1992 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3236000
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Plant species distributions are generally thought to be chiefly under environmental control, although they may be affected by disturbance events or dispersion properties of the species. The relative importance of these different factors is not easy to evaluate because they often share common spatial patterns, such that an inextricable network of relationships occurs between plant distributions, environmental conditions, disturbance events and endogenous factors such as propagule dispersion. In this paper we propose a method for untangling the common spatial component from the relationship between environmental conditions and the distribution of tree species. Using partial Mantel tests and path analysis, we test models of relationships between these data sets. Results show that in our study area, spatial patterns of species associated with hydric conditions remain largely correlated with environmental conditions. However, mesic sites show more complex forest covers, in which a significant spatial component persists when environmental variation is statistically controlled for. This remaining spatial variability suggests that other factors possessing spatial structure partly explain species distributions.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Feb 1, 1992

References

  • Forest succession
    Finegan, Finegan
  • The maintenance of species richness in plant communities: the importance of regeneration niche
    Grubb, Grubb
  • Quadratic assignment as a general data analysis strategy
    Hubert, Hubert; Schultz, Schultz

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