Studies on the effects of 5‐HT 1A drugs in the pigeon

Studies on the effects of 5‐HT 1A drugs in the pigeon A number of compounds with high receptor binding affinity for the 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT) receptor subtype designated as 5‐HT1A can produce anxiolytic and/or antidepressant effects in humans. In contrast to the traditional benzodiazepine anxiolytics, many of the clinically efficacious 5‐HT1A drugs are either ineffective or produce inconsistent results in traditional preclinical anxiolytic screens using behavioral procedures with rodents. In preclinical antidepressant models with these animals, however, effects of the 5‐HT1A drugs, as well as those of traditional antidepressant compounds, are predictive of their antidepressant activity in humans. In contrast, 5‐HT1A drugs are quite effective in pigeons studied under a rather conventional punishment or conflict‐type procedure that is also sensitive to the benzodiazepine anxiolytics. However, traditional antidepressant compounds, such as the tricyclic drugs amitriptyline and imipramine, as well as the 5‐HT reuptake blockers such as fluoxetine, do not show effects similar to the newer 5‐HT1A drugs in this procedure. Thus, in rodents, current antidepressant models are sensitive to drugs that appear to function through different mechanisms, whereas conflict‐type procedures typically do not reveal anxiolytic‐like effects with 5‐HT1A drugs. The pigeon conflict procedure, however, discriminates between the 5‐HT1A antidepressants and antidepressant drugs functioning through other systems, whereas the effects of known anxiolytics in this procedure are quite similar. Increases in punished responding with 5‐HT1A drugs correlates highly (r= +0.83) with affinity for the 5‐HT1A receptor in pigeons. This paper reviews behavioral studies conducted with the pigeon in which the focus has been on the analysis of 5‐HT1A compounds and addresses additional work that is required to answer many of the outstanding questions about this new class of anxiolytic and/or antidepressant drugs. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Drug Development Research Wiley

Studies on the effects of 5‐HT 1A drugs in the pigeon

Drug Development Research, Volume 26 (3) – Jan 1, 1992

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/studies-on-the-effects-of-5-ht-1a-drugs-in-the-pigeon-0UKtmVbQhf
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0272-4391
eISSN
1098-2299
DOI
10.1002/ddr.430260309
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A number of compounds with high receptor binding affinity for the 5‐hydroxytryptamine (5‐HT) receptor subtype designated as 5‐HT1A can produce anxiolytic and/or antidepressant effects in humans. In contrast to the traditional benzodiazepine anxiolytics, many of the clinically efficacious 5‐HT1A drugs are either ineffective or produce inconsistent results in traditional preclinical anxiolytic screens using behavioral procedures with rodents. In preclinical antidepressant models with these animals, however, effects of the 5‐HT1A drugs, as well as those of traditional antidepressant compounds, are predictive of their antidepressant activity in humans. In contrast, 5‐HT1A drugs are quite effective in pigeons studied under a rather conventional punishment or conflict‐type procedure that is also sensitive to the benzodiazepine anxiolytics. However, traditional antidepressant compounds, such as the tricyclic drugs amitriptyline and imipramine, as well as the 5‐HT reuptake blockers such as fluoxetine, do not show effects similar to the newer 5‐HT1A drugs in this procedure. Thus, in rodents, current antidepressant models are sensitive to drugs that appear to function through different mechanisms, whereas conflict‐type procedures typically do not reveal anxiolytic‐like effects with 5‐HT1A drugs. The pigeon conflict procedure, however, discriminates between the 5‐HT1A antidepressants and antidepressant drugs functioning through other systems, whereas the effects of known anxiolytics in this procedure are quite similar. Increases in punished responding with 5‐HT1A drugs correlates highly (r= +0.83) with affinity for the 5‐HT1A receptor in pigeons. This paper reviews behavioral studies conducted with the pigeon in which the focus has been on the analysis of 5‐HT1A compounds and addresses additional work that is required to answer many of the outstanding questions about this new class of anxiolytic and/or antidepressant drugs. © 1992 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Drug Development ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1992

Keywords: serotonin 5‐HT 1A receptor; antidepressant; pigeon

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off