Structured advice provided by a dietitian increases adherence of consumers to diet and lifestyle changes and lowers blood low‐density lipoprotein (LDL)‐cholesterol: the Increasing Adherence of Consumers to Diet & Lifestyle Changes to Lower (LDL) Cholesterol (ACT) randomised controlled trial

Structured advice provided by a dietitian increases adherence of consumers to diet and lifestyle... IntroductionGlobally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. However, approximately 80% of this could be prevented through positive diet and lifestyle changes, such as adopting healthy eating habits, incorporating regular exercise and maintaining abstinence from smoking (1).Elevated serum total cholesterol (TC) and especially low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‐C) are widely accepted as major modifiable risk factors of CVD.Dietary modifications such as replacing saturated with unsaturated fats, reducing dietary cholesterol intake, increasing the intake of dietary fibres and considering foods with added plant sterols or stanols are widely known to be effective in reducing TC and LDL‐C levels (2–4). Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemia, such as the 2016 EAS/ESC guidelines (4), highlight the need to lower LDL‐cholesterol levels and address the important role that diet and lifestyle change can play in the prevention of CVD. In addition to eating a healthy diet, they include recommendations on specific foods and food components with known cholesterol‐lowering benefits, such as plant sterols/stanols and dietary fibre, as well as the need to increase physical activity. Especially, a Mediterranean type diet is widely recognised as a dietary pattern that not only improves CVD risk factors, but also has beneficial effects on http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Human Nutrition & Dietetics Wiley

Structured advice provided by a dietitian increases adherence of consumers to diet and lifestyle changes and lowers blood low‐density lipoprotein (LDL)‐cholesterol: the Increasing Adherence of Consumers to Diet & Lifestyle Changes to Lower (LDL) Cholesterol (ACT) randomised controlled trial

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2018 The British Dietetic Association Ltd
ISSN
0952-3871
eISSN
1365-277X
D.O.I.
10.1111/jhn.12508
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionGlobally, cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. However, approximately 80% of this could be prevented through positive diet and lifestyle changes, such as adopting healthy eating habits, incorporating regular exercise and maintaining abstinence from smoking (1).Elevated serum total cholesterol (TC) and especially low‐density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL‐C) are widely accepted as major modifiable risk factors of CVD.Dietary modifications such as replacing saturated with unsaturated fats, reducing dietary cholesterol intake, increasing the intake of dietary fibres and considering foods with added plant sterols or stanols are widely known to be effective in reducing TC and LDL‐C levels (2–4). Guidelines for the management of dyslipidaemia, such as the 2016 EAS/ESC guidelines (4), highlight the need to lower LDL‐cholesterol levels and address the important role that diet and lifestyle change can play in the prevention of CVD. In addition to eating a healthy diet, they include recommendations on specific foods and food components with known cholesterol‐lowering benefits, such as plant sterols/stanols and dietary fibre, as well as the need to increase physical activity. Especially, a Mediterranean type diet is widely recognised as a dietary pattern that not only improves CVD risk factors, but also has beneficial effects on

Journal

Journal of Human Nutrition & DieteticsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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