Structural evolution of the Tuscan Nappe in the southeastern sector of the Apuan Alps metamorphic dome (Northern Apennines, Italy)

Structural evolution of the Tuscan Nappe in the southeastern sector of the Apuan Alps metamorphic... Structural analysis carried out in the Tuscan Nappe (TN) in the southeastern sector of the Apuan Alps highlights a structural evolution much more complex than that proposed so far. The TN has been deformed by structures developed during four deformation phases. The three early phases resulted from a compressive tectonic regime linked to the construction of the Apenninic fold‐and‐thrust‐belt. The fourth phase, instead, is connected with the extensional tectonics, probably related to the collapse of the belt and/or to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Our structural and field data suggest the following. (1) The first phase is linked to the main crustal shortening and deformation of the Tuscan Nappe in the internal sectors of the belt. (2) The second deformation phase is responsible for the prominent NW–SE‐trending folds recognized in the study area (Mt. Pescaglino and Pescaglia antiforms and Mt. Piglione and Mt. Prana synforms). (3) The direction of shortening related to the third phase is parallel to the main structural trend of the belt. (4) The interference between the third folding phase and the earlier two tectonic phases could be related to the development of the metamorphic domes. The two directions of horizontal shortening induced buckling and vertical growth of the metamorphic domes, enhancing the process of exhumation of the metamorphic rocks. (5) The exhumation of the Tuscan Nappe occurred mostly in a compressive tectonic setting. A new model for the exhumation of the metamorphic dome of the Apuan Alps is proposed. Its tectonic evolution does not fit with the previously suggested core complex model, but is due to compressive tectonics. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geological Journal Wiley

Structural evolution of the Tuscan Nappe in the southeastern sector of the Apuan Alps metamorphic dome (Northern Apennines, Italy)

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0072-1050
eISSN
1099-1034
DOI
10.1002/gj.995
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Structural analysis carried out in the Tuscan Nappe (TN) in the southeastern sector of the Apuan Alps highlights a structural evolution much more complex than that proposed so far. The TN has been deformed by structures developed during four deformation phases. The three early phases resulted from a compressive tectonic regime linked to the construction of the Apenninic fold‐and‐thrust‐belt. The fourth phase, instead, is connected with the extensional tectonics, probably related to the collapse of the belt and/or to the opening of the Tyrrhenian Sea. Our structural and field data suggest the following. (1) The first phase is linked to the main crustal shortening and deformation of the Tuscan Nappe in the internal sectors of the belt. (2) The second deformation phase is responsible for the prominent NW–SE‐trending folds recognized in the study area (Mt. Pescaglino and Pescaglia antiforms and Mt. Piglione and Mt. Prana synforms). (3) The direction of shortening related to the third phase is parallel to the main structural trend of the belt. (4) The interference between the third folding phase and the earlier two tectonic phases could be related to the development of the metamorphic domes. The two directions of horizontal shortening induced buckling and vertical growth of the metamorphic domes, enhancing the process of exhumation of the metamorphic rocks. (5) The exhumation of the Tuscan Nappe occurred mostly in a compressive tectonic setting. A new model for the exhumation of the metamorphic dome of the Apuan Alps is proposed. Its tectonic evolution does not fit with the previously suggested core complex model, but is due to compressive tectonics. Copyright © 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Geological JournalWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2005

References

  • Crustal extension in the Northern Apennines: the transition from compression to extension in the Alpi Apuane Core Complex
    Carmignani, Carmignani; Kligfield, Kligfield
  • Geology of the Higher Himalayan Crystalline in the Eastern Nepal (Khumbu Himal)
    Carosi, Carosi; Lombardo, Lombardo; Musumeci, Musumeci; Pertusati, Pertusati
  • Extensional processes driven by large‐scale duplexing in collisional regimes
    Cello, Cello; Mazzoli, Mazzoli
  • Mechanisms for folding of high‐grade rocks in extensional tectonic settings
    Harris, Harris; Koyi, Koyi; Fossen, Fossen

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