Streamflow trends in the United States

Streamflow trends in the United States Secular trends in streamflow are evaluated for 395 climate‐sensitive streamgaging stations in the conterminous United States using the non‐parametric Mann‐Kendall test. Trends are calculated for selected quantiles of discharge, from the 0th to the 100th percentile, to evaluate differences between low‐, medium‐, and high‐flow regimes during the twentieth century. Two general patterns emerge; trends are most prevalent in the annual minimum (Q0) to median (Q50) flow categories and least prevalent in the annual maximum (Q100) category; and, at all but the highest quantiles, streamflow has increased across broad sections of the United States. Decreases appear only in parts of the Pacific Northwest and the Southeast. Systematic patterns are less apparent in the Q100 flow. Hydrologically, these results indicate that the conterminous U.S. is getting wetter, but less extreme. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Geophysical Research Letters Wiley

Streamflow trends in the United States

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0094-8276
eISSN
1944-8007
DOI
10.1029/1998GL900291
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Secular trends in streamflow are evaluated for 395 climate‐sensitive streamgaging stations in the conterminous United States using the non‐parametric Mann‐Kendall test. Trends are calculated for selected quantiles of discharge, from the 0th to the 100th percentile, to evaluate differences between low‐, medium‐, and high‐flow regimes during the twentieth century. Two general patterns emerge; trends are most prevalent in the annual minimum (Q0) to median (Q50) flow categories and least prevalent in the annual maximum (Q100) category; and, at all but the highest quantiles, streamflow has increased across broad sections of the United States. Decreases appear only in parts of the Pacific Northwest and the Southeast. Systematic patterns are less apparent in the Q100 flow. Hydrologically, these results indicate that the conterminous U.S. is getting wetter, but less extreme.

Journal

Geophysical Research LettersWiley

Published: Jan 15, 1999

References

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