Streamflow from small watersheds on the western slope of the Cascade Range of Oregon

Streamflow from small watersheds on the western slope of the Cascade Range of Oregon Streamflow from small watersheds on the western slopes of the Oregon Cascade Range is strongly influenced by a maritime climate (wet winters and dry summers). Although annual precipitation is high (94 inches in the study area), overland flow is almost unknown. Peak flows result largely from subsurface flow and under conditions in which both retention and detention reservoirs are almost filled during extended periods of low‐intensity rainfall. Under these conditions, vegetation appears to exert a minimum influence on high streamflow. Lowest Streamflow occurs from late August to mid‐November and may follow a 60− to 100‐day period with little or no rain. The dense vegetation of this part of the Douglas‐fir region appears to exert its major influence at such times. Removal of vegetation from only 30% of a 250‐acre watershed has caused a 12–28% increase in minimum streamflow. On a 237‐acre watershed on which 80% of the trees were cut, the increase in low flow was 85%. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Water Resources Research Wiley

Streamflow from small watersheds on the western slope of the Cascade Range of Oregon

Water Resources Research, Volume 1 (1) – Mar 1, 1965

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
This paper is not subject to U.S.Copyright © 1965 by the American Geophysical Union.
ISSN
0043-1397
eISSN
1944-7973
DOI
10.1029/WR001i001p00125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Streamflow from small watersheds on the western slopes of the Oregon Cascade Range is strongly influenced by a maritime climate (wet winters and dry summers). Although annual precipitation is high (94 inches in the study area), overland flow is almost unknown. Peak flows result largely from subsurface flow and under conditions in which both retention and detention reservoirs are almost filled during extended periods of low‐intensity rainfall. Under these conditions, vegetation appears to exert a minimum influence on high streamflow. Lowest Streamflow occurs from late August to mid‐November and may follow a 60− to 100‐day period with little or no rain. The dense vegetation of this part of the Douglas‐fir region appears to exert its major influence at such times. Removal of vegetation from only 30% of a 250‐acre watershed has caused a 12–28% increase in minimum streamflow. On a 237‐acre watershed on which 80% of the trees were cut, the increase in low flow was 85%.

Journal

Water Resources ResearchWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1965

References

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