Stomatal responses to light and humidity in sugarcane: prediction of daily time courses and identification of potential selection criteria

Stomatal responses to light and humidity in sugarcane: prediction of daily time courses and... Abstract Stomatal sensitivities to light and VPD have potential as quantitative selection criteria in programs designed to enhance water‐use efficiency of sugarcane and other crops. These responses were characterized using gas exchange techniques and then simulated by a mathematical relationship describing conductance as a function of photon fluence rates and VPD values. The same form of relationship simulated stomatal responses of well‐watered greenhouse‐ and field‐grown plants. A comparison between simulated and measured conductance values showed a close correlation, indicating that light and VPD responses of stomata are dominant input signals modulating stomatal conductance in sugarcane. Observed conductance of Hawaiian sugarcane in a commerical production area appeared larger than required to support prevailing rates of carbon assimilation, since predicted intercellular CO2 was greater than required to saturate its C4 photosynthesis. Manipulation of the relationship describing stomatal conductance allowed us to simulate the responses of plants with hypothetically altered stomatal sensitivities to VPD or to light, using micrometeorological data collected in the field. Further simulation indicated that selection for clones with altered stomatal sensitivity to either light or VPD could improve the water‐use efficiency of sugarcane without inhibiting current high levels of productivity. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Stomatal responses to light and humidity in sugarcane: prediction of daily time courses and identification of potential selection criteria

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1987 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/1365-3040.ep11602231
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract Stomatal sensitivities to light and VPD have potential as quantitative selection criteria in programs designed to enhance water‐use efficiency of sugarcane and other crops. These responses were characterized using gas exchange techniques and then simulated by a mathematical relationship describing conductance as a function of photon fluence rates and VPD values. The same form of relationship simulated stomatal responses of well‐watered greenhouse‐ and field‐grown plants. A comparison between simulated and measured conductance values showed a close correlation, indicating that light and VPD responses of stomata are dominant input signals modulating stomatal conductance in sugarcane. Observed conductance of Hawaiian sugarcane in a commerical production area appeared larger than required to support prevailing rates of carbon assimilation, since predicted intercellular CO2 was greater than required to saturate its C4 photosynthesis. Manipulation of the relationship describing stomatal conductance allowed us to simulate the responses of plants with hypothetically altered stomatal sensitivities to VPD or to light, using micrometeorological data collected in the field. Further simulation indicated that selection for clones with altered stomatal sensitivity to either light or VPD could improve the water‐use efficiency of sugarcane without inhibiting current high levels of productivity.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1987

References

  • Stomatal response to environment and a possible interrelation between stomatal effects on transpiration and CO 2 assimilation
    Hall, Hall; Schulze, Schulze
  • Responses of apple leaf stomata: a model for single leaves and a whole tree
    Thorpe, Thorpe; Warrit, Warrit; Landsberg, Landsberg
  • Ecology of SO 2 resistance. I. Effect of fumigations on gas exchange of deciduous and evergreen shrubs
    Winner, Winner; Mooney, Mooney
  • The biology of stomatal guard cells
    Zeiger, Zeiger

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