Stomatal responses to humidity in air and helox

Stomatal responses to humidity in air and helox Abstract. Stomatal responses to humidity were studied in several species using normal air and a helium: oxygen mixture (79:21 v/v, with CO2 and water vapour added), which we termed ‘helox’. Since water vapour diffuses 2.33 times faster in helox than in air, it was possible to vary the water‐vapour concentration difference between the leaf and the air at the leaf surface independently of the transpiration rate and vice versa. The CO2 concentration at the evaporating surfaces (ci), leaf temperature and photon flux density were kept constant throughout the experiments. The results of these experiments were consistent with a mechanism for Stomatal responses to humidity that is based on the rate of water loss from the leaf. Stomata apparently did not directly sense and respond to either the water vapour concentration at the leaf surface or the difference in water vapour concentration between the leaf interior and the leaf surface. In addition, stomatal responses that caused reductions in transpiration rate at low humidities were accompanied by decreases in photosynthesis at constant ci, suggesting heterogeneous (patchy) stomatal closure. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Stomatal responses to humidity in air and helox

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 14 (5) – Jun 1, 1991

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/stomatal-responses-to-humidity-in-air-and-helox-O3TibaumTw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1991 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-3040.1991.tb01521.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Stomatal responses to humidity were studied in several species using normal air and a helium: oxygen mixture (79:21 v/v, with CO2 and water vapour added), which we termed ‘helox’. Since water vapour diffuses 2.33 times faster in helox than in air, it was possible to vary the water‐vapour concentration difference between the leaf and the air at the leaf surface independently of the transpiration rate and vice versa. The CO2 concentration at the evaporating surfaces (ci), leaf temperature and photon flux density were kept constant throughout the experiments. The results of these experiments were consistent with a mechanism for Stomatal responses to humidity that is based on the rate of water loss from the leaf. Stomata apparently did not directly sense and respond to either the water vapour concentration at the leaf surface or the difference in water vapour concentration between the leaf interior and the leaf surface. In addition, stomatal responses that caused reductions in transpiration rate at low humidities were accompanied by decreases in photosynthesis at constant ci, suggesting heterogeneous (patchy) stomatal closure.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1991

References

  • Do stomata respond to relative humidity
    Aphalo, Aphalo; Jarvis, Jarvis
  • Topography of photosynthetic activity of leaves obtained from video images of chlorophyll fluorescence
    Daley, Daley; Raschke, Raschke; Ball, Ball; Berry, Berry
  • Epidermal transpiration and stomatal responses to humidity: some hypotheses explored
    Sheriff, Sheriff

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off