Stomatal mechanics. III. Geometric interpretation of the mechanical advantage

Stomatal mechanics. III. Geometric interpretation of the mechanical advantage Abstract. Previous mathematical analyses of stomatal mechanics have demonstrated, and experimental measurements have confirmed, that the turgor‐generated force of the epidermal cells dominates that of the guard cells in determining aperture. DcMichele & Sharpe (1973) termed the phenomenon the mechanical advantage of the epidermal cells, while Cooke et al. (1976) expressed it as an antagonism ratio. Both of these formulations, however, have theoretical or practical limitations. This study presents a biophysical analysis demonstrating that the effective forces in the stomatal system may be studied in terms of simple stomatal geometry. From this analysis, the mechanical advantage can be redefined and interpreted based upon simple geometric relationships calculated from measurable anatomical dimensions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Stomatal mechanics. III. Geometric interpretation of the mechanical advantage

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/1365-3040.ep11604674
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Previous mathematical analyses of stomatal mechanics have demonstrated, and experimental measurements have confirmed, that the turgor‐generated force of the epidermal cells dominates that of the guard cells in determining aperture. DcMichele & Sharpe (1973) termed the phenomenon the mechanical advantage of the epidermal cells, while Cooke et al. (1976) expressed it as an antagonism ratio. Both of these formulations, however, have theoretical or practical limitations. This study presents a biophysical analysis demonstrating that the effective forces in the stomatal system may be studied in terms of simple stomatal geometry. From this analysis, the mechanical advantage can be redefined and interpreted based upon simple geometric relationships calculated from measurable anatomical dimensions.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Jun 1, 1985

References

  • Stomatal action
    Raschke, Raschke
  • Stomatal mechanics. II. Material properties of guard cell walls
    Wu, Wu; Sharpe, Sharpe

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