Stomatal aperture and the sensing of the environment by guard cells

Stomatal aperture and the sensing of the environment by guard cells D. W. SHERIFF*, Department of Environmental Biology, Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra City, ACT, 2601, Australia Received 5 September 1978 Introduction That stomata respond to environmental stimuli by opening and closing is well established. These responses appear to be of advantage to a plant in the way they affect water use and photosynthesis, for example by maximising photosynthesis while minimising water loss or by providing increased evaporative cooling at high temperatures. For such responses to occur, the environment must be 'sensed' so that the osmotic potentials of the guard, and possibly the subsidiary cells, will change, resulting in changes in the turgor pressure of these cells and causing the stomatal aperture to change (Edwards, Meidner & Sheriff, 1976; Meidner & Mansfield, 1968). In this short review, the role of the guard cells in sensing various aspects of the environment will be discussed. Responses of guard cells to the environment are difficult to measure directly, and this can only be done by using sophisticated equipment in carefully controlled laboratory experiments. The responses by guard cells to external factors have therefore generally been interpreted from measured changes in stomatal aperture (which the guard cells largely http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Stomatal aperture and the sensing of the environment by guard cells

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 2 (1) – Mar 1, 1979

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1979 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-3040.1979.tb00769.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

D. W. SHERIFF*, Department of Environmental Biology, Research School of Biological Sciences, The Australian National University, Canberra City, ACT, 2601, Australia Received 5 September 1978 Introduction That stomata respond to environmental stimuli by opening and closing is well established. These responses appear to be of advantage to a plant in the way they affect water use and photosynthesis, for example by maximising photosynthesis while minimising water loss or by providing increased evaporative cooling at high temperatures. For such responses to occur, the environment must be 'sensed' so that the osmotic potentials of the guard, and possibly the subsidiary cells, will change, resulting in changes in the turgor pressure of these cells and causing the stomatal aperture to change (Edwards, Meidner & Sheriff, 1976; Meidner & Mansfield, 1968). In this short review, the role of the guard cells in sensing various aspects of the environment will be discussed. Responses of guard cells to the environment are difficult to measure directly, and this can only be done by using sophisticated equipment in carefully controlled laboratory experiments. The responses by guard cells to external factors have therefore generally been interpreted from measured changes in stomatal aperture (which the guard cells largely

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1979

References

  • Regulation of transpiration in Avena. Responses to white light steps
    Brogårdh, Brogårdh; Johnsson, Johnsson
  • Evidence for two photoreactions and possible involvement of phytochrome in light‐dependent stomatal opening
    Habermann, Habermann
  • Rapid, blue‐light‐induced transpiration response restricted to plants with grass‐like stomata
    Johnsson, Johnsson; Issaias, Issaias; Brogårdh, Brogårdh; Johnsson, Johnsson
  • Effect of colored light on stomatal opening rates of Vicia faba L
    Kana, Kana; Miller, Miller
  • Stomatal response of Engelmann Spruce to humidity, light, and water stress
    Kaufmann, Kaufmann
  • Stomatal physiology
    Ketellapper, Ketellapper
  • The intracellular location of abscisic acid in stressed and non‐stressed leaf tissue
    Loveys, Loveys
  • Rapid changes in abscisic acid‐like inhibitors following alterations in vine leaf water potential
    Loveys, Loveys; Kriedmann, Kriedmann
  • Crassulacean Acid Metabolism: A curiosity in context
    Osmond, Osmond
  • Stomatal responses to pressure changes and interruptions in the water supply of detached leaves of Zea mays L
    Raschke, Raschke
  • Stomatal action
    Raschke, Raschke
  • Stomatal movement and photosynthesis in Pelargonium I
    Scarth, Scarth; Shaw, Shaw
  • Environmental and biochemical control of stomatal movement in leaves
    Zelitch, Zelitch

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