Stereotype content model across cultures: Towards universal similarities and some differences

Stereotype content model across cultures: Towards universal similarities and some differences The stereotype content model (SCM) proposes potentially universal principles of societal stereotypes and their relation to social structure. Here, the SCM reveals theoretically grounded, cross‐cultural, cross‐groups similarities and one difference across 10 non‐US nations. Seven European (individualist) and three East Asian (collectivist) nations (N=1,028) support three hypothesized cross‐cultural similarities: (a) perceived warmth and competence reliably differentiate societal group stereotypes; (b) many out‐groups receive ambivalent stereotypes (high on one dimension; low on the other); and (c) high status groups stereotypically are competent, whereas competitive groups stereotypically lack warmth. Data uncover one consequential cross‐cultural difference: (d) the more collectivist cultures do not locate reference groups (in‐groups and societal prototype groups) in the most positive cluster (high‐competence/high‐warmth), unlike individualist cultures. This demonstrates out‐group derogation without obvious reference‐group favouritism. The SCM can serve as a pancultural tool for predicting group stereotypes from structural relations with other groups in society, and comparing across societies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png British Journal of Social Psychology Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
2009 The British Psychological Society
ISSN
0144-6665
eISSN
2044-8309
D.O.I.
10.1348/014466608X314935
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The stereotype content model (SCM) proposes potentially universal principles of societal stereotypes and their relation to social structure. Here, the SCM reveals theoretically grounded, cross‐cultural, cross‐groups similarities and one difference across 10 non‐US nations. Seven European (individualist) and three East Asian (collectivist) nations (N=1,028) support three hypothesized cross‐cultural similarities: (a) perceived warmth and competence reliably differentiate societal group stereotypes; (b) many out‐groups receive ambivalent stereotypes (high on one dimension; low on the other); and (c) high status groups stereotypically are competent, whereas competitive groups stereotypically lack warmth. Data uncover one consequential cross‐cultural difference: (d) the more collectivist cultures do not locate reference groups (in‐groups and societal prototype groups) in the most positive cluster (high‐competence/high‐warmth), unlike individualist cultures. This demonstrates out‐group derogation without obvious reference‐group favouritism. The SCM can serve as a pancultural tool for predicting group stereotypes from structural relations with other groups in society, and comparing across societies.

Journal

British Journal of Social PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 2009

References

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