Stemming the exodus of women managers

Stemming the exodus of women managers Survey findings based on a national sample of CEOs and human resource managers indicate that over 50% of organizations have experienced moderate to great difficulty attracting and retaining women managers and professionals. Respondents perceived that the most serious career problems encountered by women revolve around organizational politics, career development opportunities, and family conflicts. Existing and needed human resource management policies in response to these problems are reported. A series of additional analyses highlight differences across industries, and according to company size and stage in the corporate life cycle. Based on survey findings, recommendations are discussed for human resource management practitioners concerned with increasing their companies' abilities to actively compete for and retain women managers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Resource Management Wiley

Stemming the exodus of women managers

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1989 Wiley Periodicals, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0090-4848
eISSN
1099-050X
DOI
10.1002/hrm.3930280404
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Survey findings based on a national sample of CEOs and human resource managers indicate that over 50% of organizations have experienced moderate to great difficulty attracting and retaining women managers and professionals. Respondents perceived that the most serious career problems encountered by women revolve around organizational politics, career development opportunities, and family conflicts. Existing and needed human resource management policies in response to these problems are reported. A series of additional analyses highlight differences across industries, and according to company size and stage in the corporate life cycle. Based on survey findings, recommendations are discussed for human resource management practitioners concerned with increasing their companies' abilities to actively compete for and retain women managers.

Journal

Human Resource ManagementWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1989

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