Statistical Power Analysis and Amphibian Population Trends

Statistical Power Analysis and Amphibian Population Trends Reed and Blaustein (1995) add an important perspective to the debate over amphibian population trends, asserting that if a null hypothesis of no trend is not rejected and the power of the statistical test to detect the trend was low, then the study’s results can only be considered inconclusive. Too frequently researchers infer that failure to reject a null hypothesis indicates the null is true, without considering statistical power of these tests and the consequences of committing Type II errors (Peterman 1990). Reed and Blaustein correctly assert that estimating the Type II error rate is essential when evaluating evidence suggesting no decline. Reed and Blaustein attempted to estimate the statistical power of tests using data from studies of eight amphibian populations, none of which demonstrated statistically significant trends with time. Although the authors focused on amphibian populations, they implicitly addressed the more general question of whether it is reasonable to conclude a null hypothesis to be true when it is not rejected (P ); in their analysis, the null hypotheses were that no significant correlations existed between amphibian population sizes and time. Reed and Blaustein suggest that it is only reasonable to conclude the null to be true http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Conservation Biology Wiley

Statistical Power Analysis and Amphibian Population Trends

Conservation Biology, Volume 11 (1) – Feb 17, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/statistical-power-analysis-and-amphibian-population-trends-0Aow97RfVS
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Society for Conservation Biology
ISSN
0888-8892
eISSN
1523-1739
DOI
10.1046/j.1523-1739.1997.96034.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reed and Blaustein (1995) add an important perspective to the debate over amphibian population trends, asserting that if a null hypothesis of no trend is not rejected and the power of the statistical test to detect the trend was low, then the study’s results can only be considered inconclusive. Too frequently researchers infer that failure to reject a null hypothesis indicates the null is true, without considering statistical power of these tests and the consequences of committing Type II errors (Peterman 1990). Reed and Blaustein correctly assert that estimating the Type II error rate is essential when evaluating evidence suggesting no decline. Reed and Blaustein attempted to estimate the statistical power of tests using data from studies of eight amphibian populations, none of which demonstrated statistically significant trends with time. Although the authors focused on amphibian populations, they implicitly addressed the more general question of whether it is reasonable to conclude a null hypothesis to be true when it is not rejected (P ); in their analysis, the null hypotheses were that no significant correlations existed between amphibian population sizes and time. Reed and Blaustein suggest that it is only reasonable to conclude the null to be true

Journal

Conservation BiologyWiley

Published: Feb 17, 1997

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month