Stationary single waves in turbulent open‐channel flow

Stationary single waves in turbulent open‐channel flow Steady two‐dimensional turbulent open‐channel flow is considered. Stationary single‐wave solutions are investigated. The fully‐developed oncoming flow is slightly supercritical. The Reynolds number is very large. The analysis is kept free of turbulence modelling. As stationary solitary waves cannot exist in turbulent flow for a plane bottom with constant roughness [1], two particular perturbations of the conditions at the channel bottom are examined: 1) We revisit the case [1] where the friction coefficient locally differs slightly by a constant from the reference value upstream; 2) An unevenness of very small height in the channel bottom (bump, ramp) is admitted, with the bottom roughness taken constant. An analogy between these cases is presented. In both cases, three stationary solutions for the surface elevation are found: A stable and an unstable solitary wave, respectively, and a single wave of a second kind with smaller amplitude. For the latter, an analysis for weak dissipation yields a uniformly valid solution that is in good agreement with the numerical results for various parameters. (© 2017 Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings in Applied Mathematics & Mechanics Wiley

Stationary single waves in turbulent open‐channel flow

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/stationary-single-waves-in-turbulent-open-channel-flow-cpCeYMjjNk
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
1617-7061
eISSN
1617-7061
D.O.I.
10.1002/pamm.201710310
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Steady two‐dimensional turbulent open‐channel flow is considered. Stationary single‐wave solutions are investigated. The fully‐developed oncoming flow is slightly supercritical. The Reynolds number is very large. The analysis is kept free of turbulence modelling. As stationary solitary waves cannot exist in turbulent flow for a plane bottom with constant roughness [1], two particular perturbations of the conditions at the channel bottom are examined: 1) We revisit the case [1] where the friction coefficient locally differs slightly by a constant from the reference value upstream; 2) An unevenness of very small height in the channel bottom (bump, ramp) is admitted, with the bottom roughness taken constant. An analogy between these cases is presented. In both cases, three stationary solutions for the surface elevation are found: A stable and an unstable solitary wave, respectively, and a single wave of a second kind with smaller amplitude. For the latter, an analysis for weak dissipation yields a uniformly valid solution that is in good agreement with the numerical results for various parameters. (© 2017 Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

Journal

Proceedings in Applied Mathematics & MechanicsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off