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Stage and Screen Freuds

Stage and Screen Freuds DOI 10.1002/aps.1497 FILM AND THEATER REVIEW AND COMMENTARY When they asked David Cronenberg about his representation of Freud in A Dangerous Method he said that he did not wish to destroy or extol his subject, just to “resurrect real people as much as art will let you do that” and to let the audience “react to that reality” (Feeney, 2011). Of course we have spent time in psychoanalysis, as have our counter- parts in every other field in the arts and sciences, pointing out the inevitable subjectivity of such realities. In film, our subject, a historical personage or not, will be constructed out of a few carefully selected strips of spliced cellophane. In theater, out of a handful of lines. Certainly Cronenberg, or Mark St Germain in an alternate resurrection of Freud in his play Freud's Last Session, do not harbor the illusion that have “captured” their subjects in all of their complexity. Rather they offer a certain idea of Jung or Spielrein, or, in the play, of Freud or Lewis, snapshots at certain moments with certain emphases and dramatic agendas. There have been many cinematic and dramatic Freuds. We all have our favorites. It is interesting to speculate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1497
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DOI 10.1002/aps.1497 FILM AND THEATER REVIEW AND COMMENTARY When they asked David Cronenberg about his representation of Freud in A Dangerous Method he said that he did not wish to destroy or extol his subject, just to “resurrect real people as much as art will let you do that” and to let the audience “react to that reality” (Feeney, 2011). Of course we have spent time in psychoanalysis, as have our counter- parts in every other field in the arts and sciences, pointing out the inevitable subjectivity of such realities. In film, our subject, a historical personage or not, will be constructed out of a few carefully selected strips of spliced cellophane. In theater, out of a handful of lines. Certainly Cronenberg, or Mark St Germain in an alternate resurrection of Freud in his play Freud's Last Session, do not harbor the illusion that have “captured” their subjects in all of their complexity. Rather they offer a certain idea of Jung or Spielrein, or, in the play, of Freud or Lewis, snapshots at certain moments with certain emphases and dramatic agendas. There have been many cinematic and dramatic Freuds. We all have our favorites. It is interesting to speculate

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Dec 1, 2016

References