Species identification by oligonucleotide hybridisation: the influence of processing of meat products

Species identification by oligonucleotide hybridisation: the influence of processing of meat... We have evaluated the influence of meat processing on the results obtained with a species identification test by DNA oligonucleotide hybridisation. Freezing and thawing of meat did not cause a substantial reduction in the hybridisation signal. Heating of meat at 100°C or 120°C, however, led to signal reduction caused by DNA degradation, but identification was still possible. The signal is highly influenced by the kind of tissues processed. Four extensively processed products with 50 g kg−1 species admixtures were tested. Admixtures could be detected in three products but no hybridisation signal was observed with corned beef. We conclude that the quantification of admixtures by hybridisation is not better than with most alternative methods of species identification, as the strength of the signal depends on factors such as tissue origin and sample processing. © 1999 Society of Chemical Industry http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture Wiley

Species identification by oligonucleotide hybridisation: the influence of processing of meat products

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Society of Chemical Industry
ISSN
0022-5142
eISSN
1097-0010
D.O.I.
10.1002/(SICI)1097-0010(199901)79:1<53::AID-JSFA171>3.0.CO;2-E
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

We have evaluated the influence of meat processing on the results obtained with a species identification test by DNA oligonucleotide hybridisation. Freezing and thawing of meat did not cause a substantial reduction in the hybridisation signal. Heating of meat at 100°C or 120°C, however, led to signal reduction caused by DNA degradation, but identification was still possible. The signal is highly influenced by the kind of tissues processed. Four extensively processed products with 50 g kg−1 species admixtures were tested. Admixtures could be detected in three products but no hybridisation signal was observed with corned beef. We conclude that the quantification of admixtures by hybridisation is not better than with most alternative methods of species identification, as the strength of the signal depends on factors such as tissue origin and sample processing. © 1999 Society of Chemical Industry

Journal

Journal of the Science of Food and AgricultureWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

  • Use of antisera to heat‐stable antigens of adrenals for species identification in thoroughly cooked beef sausages
    Hayden, Hayden
  • Rapid species identification by using satellite DNA probes
    Buntjer, Buntjer; Lenstra, Lenstra; Haagsma, Haagsma
  • Identification of the species of origin of raw and cooked meat products using oligonucleotide probes
    Hunt, Hunt; Parkes, Parkes; Lumley, Lumley

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