Spatio‐temporal distribution of acidic and basic FGF indicates a role for FGF in rat lens morphogenesis

Spatio‐temporal distribution of acidic and basic FGF indicates a role for FGF in rat lens... As part of an investigation into the role FGF in lens development, we have studied the distribution of both aFGF and bFGF during eye morphogenesis from embryonic days 10 to 18 (E10–E18) in the rat. For aFGF, reactivity was found only in ectoderm at E10, prior to contact between the optic vesicle and presumptive lens ectoderm. During lens placode formation (E11) there was a transient, diffuse reactivity for aFGF in anterior optic vesicle cells directly apposed to the labelled ectoderm of the lens placode. At E12 the diffuse reactivity of the lens placode had changed to a discrete localisation along the basolateral surfaces of differentiating cells in the lens pit. Similar reactivity was associated with neuroblasts along the inner margin of the optic cup. At the early lens vesicle stage (E13) the baso‐lateral aFGF‐like reactivity associated with elongating lens cells was more intense and extensive. From the late lens vesicle stage (E14) to E18, reactivity in the lens was increasingly restricted to the equatorial regions which incorporate the germinative and transitional zones. From E16 to E18, aFGF‐like reactivity in the retina was predominantly localised in the peripheral regions corresponding to the developing ciliary body and iris and in the central retina associated with ganglion cell axons. For bFGF, weak reactivity was detectable as early as E13 in the developing lens capsule and increased in intensity during lens development with the posterior capsule reacting more intensely than the anterior capsule. Retinal bFGF‐like reactivity was first detected at E14, associated with differentiating ganglion cells in the central retina. From E16 to E18 the retinal ganglion cells showed increasing reactivity and the pattern of reactivity followed the centro‐peripheral pattern of retinal development. Thus reactivity for aFGF is first detected in presumptive lens ectoderm and subsequently in optic vesicle cells which are closely associated with lens ectoderm. This raises the possibility that aFGF may be involved in inductive interactions between presumptive lens ectoderm and optic vesicle. Furthermore the localisation patterns established for both aFGF and bFGF during lens and retina morphogenesis suggest an important role for FGF in regulating their morphogenesis and growth. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Dynamics Wiley

Spatio‐temporal distribution of acidic and basic FGF indicates a role for FGF in rat lens morphogenesis

Developmental Dynamics, Volume 198 (3) – Nov 1, 1993

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.
ISSN
1058-8388
eISSN
1097-0177
DOI
10.1002/aja.1001980305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

As part of an investigation into the role FGF in lens development, we have studied the distribution of both aFGF and bFGF during eye morphogenesis from embryonic days 10 to 18 (E10–E18) in the rat. For aFGF, reactivity was found only in ectoderm at E10, prior to contact between the optic vesicle and presumptive lens ectoderm. During lens placode formation (E11) there was a transient, diffuse reactivity for aFGF in anterior optic vesicle cells directly apposed to the labelled ectoderm of the lens placode. At E12 the diffuse reactivity of the lens placode had changed to a discrete localisation along the basolateral surfaces of differentiating cells in the lens pit. Similar reactivity was associated with neuroblasts along the inner margin of the optic cup. At the early lens vesicle stage (E13) the baso‐lateral aFGF‐like reactivity associated with elongating lens cells was more intense and extensive. From the late lens vesicle stage (E14) to E18, reactivity in the lens was increasingly restricted to the equatorial regions which incorporate the germinative and transitional zones. From E16 to E18, aFGF‐like reactivity in the retina was predominantly localised in the peripheral regions corresponding to the developing ciliary body and iris and in the central retina associated with ganglion cell axons. For bFGF, weak reactivity was detectable as early as E13 in the developing lens capsule and increased in intensity during lens development with the posterior capsule reacting more intensely than the anterior capsule. Retinal bFGF‐like reactivity was first detected at E14, associated with differentiating ganglion cells in the central retina. From E16 to E18 the retinal ganglion cells showed increasing reactivity and the pattern of reactivity followed the centro‐peripheral pattern of retinal development. Thus reactivity for aFGF is first detected in presumptive lens ectoderm and subsequently in optic vesicle cells which are closely associated with lens ectoderm. This raises the possibility that aFGF may be involved in inductive interactions between presumptive lens ectoderm and optic vesicle. Furthermore the localisation patterns established for both aFGF and bFGF during lens and retina morphogenesis suggest an important role for FGF in regulating their morphogenesis and growth. © 1993 Wiley‐Liss, Inc.

Journal

Developmental DynamicsWiley

Published: Nov 1, 1993

References

  • The heparin‐binding (fibroblast) growth factor family of proteins
    Burgess, Burgess; Maciag, Maciag
  • FGF receptor expression during lens morphogenesis and growth
    De Iongh, De Iongh; Lovicu, Lovicu; Hanneken, Hanneken; Maher, Maher; Baird, Baird; McAvoy, McAvoy
  • Distribution of basic fibroblast growth factor in the 18‐day rat fetus: Localization in the basement membranes of diverse tissues
    Gonzalez, Gonzalez; Buscaglia, Buscaglia; Ong, Ong; Baird, Baird
  • Basic fibroblast growth factor in atria and ventricles of the vertebrate heart
    Kardami, Kardami; Fandrich, Fandrich
  • Nuclear and cytoplasmic localization of different basic fibroblast growth factor species
    Renko, Renko; Quarto, Quarto; Morimoto, Morimoto; Rifkin, Rifkin
  • Recent developments in the cell biology of basic fibroblast growth factor
    Rifkin, Rifkin; Moscatelli, Moscatelli
  • Culture induced increase in acidic and basic fibroblast growth factor activities and their association with the nuclei of vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells
    Speir, Speir; Sasse, Sasse; Shrivastav, Shrivastav; Cascells, Cascells

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