Spatial patterns in the species richness of birds in the New World

Spatial patterns in the species richness of birds in the New World Spatial patterns m species richness of the complete New World avifauna were analysed, using data previously employed to examine spatial trends in geographic range size This allowed variation in the patterns to be compared Species richness was highest around the equator, and decreased towards higher latitudes in both hemispheres This decrease was asymmetrical, at equivalent latitudes, richness was higher in the southern than in the northern hemisphere, although the reverse was true for a measure of endemism Controlling for latitude, species richness was higher in the west than m the east The net primary productivity of, and solar radiation received by an area were both correlated with species richness However, neither explained more variation in richness than did latitude No single mechanism developed to explain spatial patterns in species richness satisfactrily explains the patterns observed in the New World avifauna We discuss, reasons why this might be the case Finally, we point out that species richness at low latitudes is not simply a multiplication of richness at high latitudes, species found at high and low latitudes are unlikely to be ecologically equivalent Any mechanism that is proposed to explain richness patterns in New World birds will need also to account for this observation http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecography Wiley

Spatial patterns in the species richness of birds in the New World

Ecography, Volume 19 (4) – Dec 1, 1996

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/spatial-patterns-in-the-species-richness-of-birds-in-the-new-world-AwoHkUr2nX
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1996 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0906-7590
eISSN
1600-0587
DOI
10.1111/j.1600-0587.1996.tb00001.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Spatial patterns m species richness of the complete New World avifauna were analysed, using data previously employed to examine spatial trends in geographic range size This allowed variation in the patterns to be compared Species richness was highest around the equator, and decreased towards higher latitudes in both hemispheres This decrease was asymmetrical, at equivalent latitudes, richness was higher in the southern than in the northern hemisphere, although the reverse was true for a measure of endemism Controlling for latitude, species richness was higher in the west than m the east The net primary productivity of, and solar radiation received by an area were both correlated with species richness However, neither explained more variation in richness than did latitude No single mechanism developed to explain spatial patterns in species richness satisfactrily explains the patterns observed in the New World avifauna We discuss, reasons why this might be the case Finally, we point out that species richness at low latitudes is not simply a multiplication of richness at high latitudes, species found at high and low latitudes are unlikely to be ecologically equivalent Any mechanism that is proposed to explain richness patterns in New World birds will need also to account for this observation

Journal

EcographyWiley

Published: Dec 1, 1996

References

  • Patterns of communities in the tropics
    MacArthur, MacArthur

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off