Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Soul of an Agency: Psychodynamic Principles in Action in the World of Community Mental Health

Soul of an Agency: Psychodynamic Principles in Action in the World of Community Mental Health Community mental health has undergone a number of evolutions since Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty and gave birth to the community mental health movement. This paper describes a philosophy of treatment involving long‐term psychotherapy to resistant and multiple problem families in disadvantaged communities. The agency's primary philosophy is described as a psychoanalytic frame that guides treatment from a secure attachment site (clinic) in the community. The interventions use home and community based therapists with supports from psychiatry, psychology, and therapeutic mentoring. The focus of all treatment is for high‐risk families to remain in the community and not burden corrections, courts, child welfare, or juvenile justice systems. Therapy forms the connection that can help families navigate schools, medical providers, courts, and social service systems. The agency forms the positive attachment site; clinicians come and go. The net effect is sustained connection to families that would have otherwise been broken apart by domestic violence, school crimes, addiction, gangs, poverty, homelessness, and community violence. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic Studies Wiley

Soul of an Agency: Psychodynamic Principles in Action in the World of Community Mental Health

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/soul-of-an-agency-psychodynamic-principles-in-action-in-the-world-of-0hArxecT3H
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1742-3341
eISSN
1556-9187
DOI
10.1002/aps.1401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Community mental health has undergone a number of evolutions since Lyndon Johnson declared a War on Poverty and gave birth to the community mental health movement. This paper describes a philosophy of treatment involving long‐term psychotherapy to resistant and multiple problem families in disadvantaged communities. The agency's primary philosophy is described as a psychoanalytic frame that guides treatment from a secure attachment site (clinic) in the community. The interventions use home and community based therapists with supports from psychiatry, psychology, and therapeutic mentoring. The focus of all treatment is for high‐risk families to remain in the community and not burden corrections, courts, child welfare, or juvenile justice systems. Therapy forms the connection that can help families navigate schools, medical providers, courts, and social service systems. The agency forms the positive attachment site; clinicians come and go. The net effect is sustained connection to families that would have otherwise been broken apart by domestic violence, school crimes, addiction, gangs, poverty, homelessness, and community violence. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

International Journal of Applied Psychoanalytic StudiesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2014

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References