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Somebody's Trying to Kill Me and I Think It's My Husband: The Modern Gothic

Somebody's Trying to Kill Me and I Think It's My Husband: The Modern Gothic ’ w q ,)I,D;-~ THE MODERN GOTHIC exeditor of Ace Books, their history in this country: began in the early ’60s. . . . But books like this have always been written especially in England, where they were called romances . . . from about 1950 on; they were never big things over there, just a steady small market. It started at Ace . . . [which] bought some novels by Victoria Holt and Phyllis A. Whitney. They sold like anything. . . . [Ace] continued and expanded the Gothic list here, including especially buying rights t o early novels by Dorothy Eden and Anne Maybury . . . both now big-selling writers.* Modern Gothics unlike nurse novels and the confession magazines, are read by middle-class women or women with middle-class aspirations, and for some reason the books written by Englishwomen have remained the most popular, at least at Ace. In 1970 I asked Terry Carr to provide me with some of their longest-selling and bestselling books; according to Mr. Carr they are “representative of the higher ranges of the field” and all seem to be reprints of earlier works (one as early as 1953).t Also according t http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Popular Culture Wiley

Somebody's Trying to Kill Me and I Think It's My Husband: The Modern Gothic

The Journal of Popular Culture , Volume 6 (4) – Mar 1, 1973

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1973 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0022-3840
eISSN
1540-5931
DOI
10.1111/j.0022-3840.1973.00666.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

’ w q ,)I,D;-~ THE MODERN GOTHIC exeditor of Ace Books, their history in this country: began in the early ’60s. . . . But books like this have always been written especially in England, where they were called romances . . . from about 1950 on; they were never big things over there, just a steady small market. It started at Ace . . . [which] bought some novels by Victoria Holt and Phyllis A. Whitney. They sold like anything. . . . [Ace] continued and expanded the Gothic list here, including especially buying rights t o early novels by Dorothy Eden and Anne Maybury . . . both now big-selling writers.* Modern Gothics unlike nurse novels and the confession magazines, are read by middle-class women or women with middle-class aspirations, and for some reason the books written by Englishwomen have remained the most popular, at least at Ace. In 1970 I asked Terry Carr to provide me with some of their longest-selling and bestselling books; according to Mr. Carr they are “representative of the higher ranges of the field” and all seem to be reprints of earlier works (one as early as 1953).t Also according t

Journal

The Journal of Popular CultureWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1973

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