SOLITARY DEATH: A NEW PROBLEM OF AN AGING SOCIETY IN JAPAN

SOLITARY DEATH: A NEW PROBLEM OF AN AGING SOCIETY IN JAPAN To the Editor: Japan, although it has the longest life expectancy in the world, has dramatically transformed its living arrangements for older adults in the past few decades. The number of elderly people who live alone has reached epidemic proportions, with more than 4.3 million. These individuals are not only slightly older and unhealthier than elderly people living with someone else, but also have less communication with their neighbors; 8.9% of elderly Japanese people living alone do not communicate with their neighbors in their everyday lives. The collapse of the conventional local community ties may have caused problems leading to Kodokushi (solitary death) or passing away alone at home, unnoticed by anyone else. Elderly people with no one to care for them are at a risk of dying suddenly in their own homes from an accident or a disease. To make matters worse, their bodies are often left unattended for several days, even over months or years. In Japan, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 people die in Kodokushi every year. This letter reports on Kodokushi in a Japanese urban area and discusses the role of social networks in solving the problem. The data for this study were http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of American Geriatrics Society Wiley

SOLITARY DEATH: A NEW PROBLEM OF AN AGING SOCIETY IN JAPAN

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/solitary-death-a-new-problem-of-an-aging-society-in-japan-EdTJ1q03BH
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2011,Copyright © 2011, The American Geriatrics Society
ISSN
0002-8614
eISSN
1532-5415
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1532-5415.2010.03216.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

To the Editor: Japan, although it has the longest life expectancy in the world, has dramatically transformed its living arrangements for older adults in the past few decades. The number of elderly people who live alone has reached epidemic proportions, with more than 4.3 million. These individuals are not only slightly older and unhealthier than elderly people living with someone else, but also have less communication with their neighbors; 8.9% of elderly Japanese people living alone do not communicate with their neighbors in their everyday lives. The collapse of the conventional local community ties may have caused problems leading to Kodokushi (solitary death) or passing away alone at home, unnoticed by anyone else. Elderly people with no one to care for them are at a risk of dying suddenly in their own homes from an accident or a disease. To make matters worse, their bodies are often left unattended for several days, even over months or years. In Japan, it is estimated that nearly 30,000 people die in Kodokushi every year. This letter reports on Kodokushi in a Japanese urban area and discusses the role of social networks in solving the problem. The data for this study were

Journal

Journal of American Geriatrics SocietyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2011

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off