Soil loss variation within a Colorado Alpine area

Soil loss variation within a Colorado Alpine area The areally weighted surface erosion for Niwot Ridge, an alpine interfluve in the Colorado Front Range, is 10−1 mm/y. This may be subdivided into rates for three generalized cover types: tundra meadow, 10−2 mm/y; dry tundra, 10−1 mm/y; late‐lying snow patches, 10° mm/y. Tundra meadow (about 50 per cent of the interfluve area) yields about 5 per cent of the eroded material; dry tundra (35 per cent of the area) contributes slightly less than 50 per cent of the eroded material; while nivation hollows occupied by late‐lying snow patches occupy only about 3 per cent of the area they contribute 50 per cent of the eroded material. The bulk of the surficial erosion is accomplished between June and September, primarily by rainsplash, except where snowmelt is important. The overall estimated surface lowering rate presented here is substantially higher than those reported previously. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Earth Surface Processes and Landforms Wiley

Soil loss variation within a Colorado Alpine area

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1981 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd
ISSN
0197-9337
eISSN
1096-9837
D.O.I.
10.1002/esp.3290060208
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The areally weighted surface erosion for Niwot Ridge, an alpine interfluve in the Colorado Front Range, is 10−1 mm/y. This may be subdivided into rates for three generalized cover types: tundra meadow, 10−2 mm/y; dry tundra, 10−1 mm/y; late‐lying snow patches, 10° mm/y. Tundra meadow (about 50 per cent of the interfluve area) yields about 5 per cent of the eroded material; dry tundra (35 per cent of the area) contributes slightly less than 50 per cent of the eroded material; while nivation hollows occupied by late‐lying snow patches occupy only about 3 per cent of the area they contribute 50 per cent of the eroded material. The bulk of the surficial erosion is accomplished between June and September, primarily by rainsplash, except where snowmelt is important. The overall estimated surface lowering rate presented here is substantially higher than those reported previously.

Journal

Earth Surface Processes and LandformsWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1981

References

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