Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards

Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards Objective. County‐level socioeconomic and demographic data were used to construct an index of social vulnerability to environmental hazards, called the Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for the United States based on 1990 data. Methods. Using a factor analytic approach, 42 variables were reduced to 11 independent factors that accounted for about 76 percent of the variance. These factors were placed in an additive model to compute a summary score—the Social Vulnerability Index. Results. There are some distinct spatial patterns in the SoVI, with the most vulnerable counties clustered in metropolitan counties in the east, south Texas, and the Mississippi Delta region. Conclusion. Those factors that contribute to the overall score often are different for each county, underscoring the interactive nature of social vulnerability—some components increase vulnerability; others moderate the effects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Science Quarterly Wiley

Social Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0038-4941
eISSN
1540-6237
D.O.I.
10.1111/1540-6237.8402002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective. County‐level socioeconomic and demographic data were used to construct an index of social vulnerability to environmental hazards, called the Social Vulnerability Index (SoVI) for the United States based on 1990 data. Methods. Using a factor analytic approach, 42 variables were reduced to 11 independent factors that accounted for about 76 percent of the variance. These factors were placed in an additive model to compute a summary score—the Social Vulnerability Index. Results. There are some distinct spatial patterns in the SoVI, with the most vulnerable counties clustered in metropolitan counties in the east, south Texas, and the Mississippi Delta region. Conclusion. Those factors that contribute to the overall score often are different for each county, underscoring the interactive nature of social vulnerability—some components increase vulnerability; others moderate the effects.

Journal

Social Science QuarterlyWiley

Published: Jun 1, 2003

References

  • Shelter, Housing and Recovery
    Bolin, Bolin; Stanford, Stanford
  • Vulnerability to Environmental Hazards
    Cutter, Cutter
  • Social Indicators
    Land, Land
  • Identifying and Mapping Community Vulnerability
    Morrow, Morrow
  • Lifelines
    Platt, Platt

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