Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You and Your Team.

Learn More →

Social Stressors at Work, Sleep Quality and Psychosomatic Health Complaints—A Longitudinal Ambulatory Field Study

Social Stressors at Work, Sleep Quality and Psychosomatic Health Complaints—A Longitudinal... There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality—objectively assessed sleep‐onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality—as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep‐onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow‐up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Stress and Health Wiley

Social Stressors at Work, Sleep Quality and Psychosomatic Health Complaints—A Longitudinal Ambulatory Field Study

Stress and Health , Volume 30 (1) – Feb 1, 2014

Loading next page...
1
 
/lp/wiley/social-stressors-at-work-sleep-quality-and-psychosomatic-health-zWnpANYRmd
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
1532-3005
eISSN
1532-2998
DOI
10.1002/smi.2494
pmid
23824588
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

There is increasing evidence that occupational stress increases psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. The present longitudinal actigraphy field study investigated the role of sleep quality—objectively assessed sleep‐onset latency, sleep efficiency and sleep fragmentation, and subjectively assessed sleep quality—as a mediator in the relationship between stressful work conditions at time 1 and psychosomatic health complaints at time 2. A longitudinal hierarchical regression analysis revealed that social stressors at work were positively related to objectively assessed sleep fragmentation and to psychosomatic health complaints. Moreover, objectively assessed sleep fragmentation mediated the effect of social stressors at work on psychosomatic health complaints. Contrary to our expectations, social stressors at work were not related to other sleep quality parameters (i.e. sleep‐onset latency, sleep efficiency and subjectively assessed sleep quality) during follow‐up. Sleep fragmentation is discussed as an important consequence of social stressors at work that increase the risk of psychosomatic health complaints in the long run. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Stress and HealthWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2014

References