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Social Justice: Outcome and Procedure

Social Justice: Outcome and Procedure A review of recent research demonstrates that people are more willing to accept decisions when they feel that those decisions are made through decision‐making procedures they view as fair. Studies of procedural justice judgements further suggest that people evaluate fairness primarily through criteria that can be provided to all the parties to a conflict: whether there are opportunities to participate; whether the authorities are neutral; the degree to which people trust the motives of the authorities; and whether people are treated with dignity and respect during the process. These findings are optimistic and suggest that authorities have considerable ability to bridge differences and interests and values through the use of fair decision‐making procedures. The limits to the effectiveness of such procedural approaches are also outlined. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Psychology Wiley

Social Justice: Outcome and Procedure

International Journal of Psychology , Volume 35 (2) – Apr 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
© 2000 International Union of Psychological Science
ISSN
0020-7594
eISSN
1464-066X
DOI
10.1080/002075900399411
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A review of recent research demonstrates that people are more willing to accept decisions when they feel that those decisions are made through decision‐making procedures they view as fair. Studies of procedural justice judgements further suggest that people evaluate fairness primarily through criteria that can be provided to all the parties to a conflict: whether there are opportunities to participate; whether the authorities are neutral; the degree to which people trust the motives of the authorities; and whether people are treated with dignity and respect during the process. These findings are optimistic and suggest that authorities have considerable ability to bridge differences and interests and values through the use of fair decision‐making procedures. The limits to the effectiveness of such procedural approaches are also outlined.

Journal

International Journal of PsychologyWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2000

References

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