Social functioning in bipolar patients: the perception and perspective of patients, relatives and advocacy organizations – a review

Social functioning in bipolar patients: the perception and perspective of patients, relatives and... Objective: Recent evidence suggests that bipolar disorder (BD) may alter social functioning in stabilized bipolar patients. We reviewed the available published material on the ‘perception and perspective’ of bipolar patients, relatives and advocacy organizations concerning the impact of BD on their lifestyle and social functioning. This review seeks to highlight some of the key issues from the patient's perspective. Methods: A systematic, computer‐assisted, literature search (MEDLINE, Medscape, Cochrane Library, PubMed) was performed. Seventeen relevant reports were found providing examples of how BD patients and their relatives perceive the impact of the disorder on social functioning and previous and current lifestyles. The data reported were analysed and discussed. Results: The negative impact of BD on a patient's life is high. The relationship with the family appears to be severely and adversely affected in most cases. Stigmatization and rejection within the family appear as important problems. The family's hostile attitude is often due to misinformation and a lack of understanding about the condition. Well‐informed relatives, openly supportive, may play a significant role in the recovery process. The presence of stigma, delay in correct diagnosis and high levels of unemployment or frequent problems in retaining employment are reported by a large majority of respondents. Conclusions: There is a real need for an enhanced education, information and awareness program aimed at BD patients, physicians, family members and the public. This will aid diagnosis, reduce current levels of stigmatization and prejudice surrounding the condition while assisting the reintegration of former and present patients back into the community. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Bipolar Disorders Wiley

Social functioning in bipolar patients: the perception and perspective of patients, relatives and advocacy organizations – a review

Bipolar Disorders, Volume 9 (1‐2) – Feb 1, 2007

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
1398-5647
eISSN
1399-5618
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1399-5618.2007.00339.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Objective: Recent evidence suggests that bipolar disorder (BD) may alter social functioning in stabilized bipolar patients. We reviewed the available published material on the ‘perception and perspective’ of bipolar patients, relatives and advocacy organizations concerning the impact of BD on their lifestyle and social functioning. This review seeks to highlight some of the key issues from the patient's perspective. Methods: A systematic, computer‐assisted, literature search (MEDLINE, Medscape, Cochrane Library, PubMed) was performed. Seventeen relevant reports were found providing examples of how BD patients and their relatives perceive the impact of the disorder on social functioning and previous and current lifestyles. The data reported were analysed and discussed. Results: The negative impact of BD on a patient's life is high. The relationship with the family appears to be severely and adversely affected in most cases. Stigmatization and rejection within the family appear as important problems. The family's hostile attitude is often due to misinformation and a lack of understanding about the condition. Well‐informed relatives, openly supportive, may play a significant role in the recovery process. The presence of stigma, delay in correct diagnosis and high levels of unemployment or frequent problems in retaining employment are reported by a large majority of respondents. Conclusions: There is a real need for an enhanced education, information and awareness program aimed at BD patients, physicians, family members and the public. This will aid diagnosis, reduce current levels of stigmatization and prejudice surrounding the condition while assisting the reintegration of former and present patients back into the community.

Journal

Bipolar DisordersWiley

Published: Feb 1, 2007

References

  • Clinical consequences of under‐recognized bipolar spectrum disorder
    Dunner, Dunner
  • Bipolar disorder during adolescence and young adulthood in a community sample
    Lewinsohn, Lewinsohn; Klein, Klein; Seeley, Seeley
  • GAMIAN‐Europe/BEAM survey I – global analysis of a patient questionnaire circulated to 3450 members of 12 European advocacy groups operating in the field of mood disorders
    Morselli, Morselli; Elgie, Elgie
  • GAMIAN‐Europe/BEAM survey II: cross‐national analysis of unemployment, family history, treatment satisfaction and impact of the bipolar disorder on life style
    Morselli, Morselli; Elgie, Elgie; Cesana, Cesana
  • Quality of life in patients with bipolar‐I depression: data from 920 patients
    Yatham, Yatham; Lecrubier, Lecrubier; Fieve, Fieve; Davis, Davis; Harris, Harris; Krishnan, Krishnan
  • Present and future role of mental illness advocacy associations in the management of the mentally ill: realities, need and hopes at the edges of the third millennium
    Morselli, Morselli
  • Psychotherapy for bipolar depression: a phase specific treatment
    Swartz, Swartz; Frank, Frank

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