SOCIAL AND SITUATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF INTERVIEW DECISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW

SOCIAL AND SITUATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF INTERVIEW DECISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EMPLOYMENT... DURING last 25 years, four separate reviews of research o n the the interview have appeared (Mayfield, 1964; Ulrich and Trumbo, 1965; Wagner, 1949; and Wright, 1969). Each of these reviews discussed dozens of studies and concluded that the interview as employed in many employment situations lacks both reliability and validity. However, the interview continues to be a popular selection tool. Evidence of this popularity is the continued proliferation of how-to-interview manuals (e.g., Morgan and Cogger, 1972) despite a call for a moratorium (England and Paterson, 1970). The importance of understanding the interview is underscored by this continued widespread use and the EEOC guidelines on employment procedures (Federal Register, Vol. 35, Pt. 1607, Aug. I , 1970). It has become increasingly evident that employers are legally responsible for showing that their selection process (including interviews) is job related. Since the last review of the employment interview literature (Wright, 1969), a good deal of the research has focused on the determination of the factors which affect the decision-making process in the interview reflecting both earlier disillusionment with reliability and validity data and the desire to understand the interview process itself. Recent studies have tended to be microanalytic and experimental http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Personnel Psychology Wiley

SOCIAL AND SITUATIONAL DETERMINANTS OF INTERVIEW DECISIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR THE EMPLOYMENT INTERVIEW

Personnel Psychology, Volume 29 (1) – Mar 1, 1976

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1976 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0031-5826
eISSN
1744-6570
DOI
10.1111/j.1744-6570.1976.tb00404.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

DURING last 25 years, four separate reviews of research o n the the interview have appeared (Mayfield, 1964; Ulrich and Trumbo, 1965; Wagner, 1949; and Wright, 1969). Each of these reviews discussed dozens of studies and concluded that the interview as employed in many employment situations lacks both reliability and validity. However, the interview continues to be a popular selection tool. Evidence of this popularity is the continued proliferation of how-to-interview manuals (e.g., Morgan and Cogger, 1972) despite a call for a moratorium (England and Paterson, 1970). The importance of understanding the interview is underscored by this continued widespread use and the EEOC guidelines on employment procedures (Federal Register, Vol. 35, Pt. 1607, Aug. I , 1970). It has become increasingly evident that employers are legally responsible for showing that their selection process (including interviews) is job related. Since the last review of the employment interview literature (Wright, 1969), a good deal of the research has focused on the determination of the factors which affect the decision-making process in the interview reflecting both earlier disillusionment with reliability and validity data and the desire to understand the interview process itself. Recent studies have tended to be microanalytic and experimental

Journal

Personnel PsychologyWiley

Published: Mar 1, 1976

References

  • Selection interview decisions: the effect of interviewer experience, relative quota situation, and applicant sample on interviewer decisions
    Carlson, Carlson
  • Race of interviewer and the language elaboration of black interviewees
    Ledvinka, Ledvinka
  • Selection interview decisions: first results from a long‐term research project
    Mayfield, Mayfield; Carlson, Carlson
  • The employment interview: A critical summary
    Wagner, Wagner
  • Summary of research on the selection interview since 1964
    Wright, Wright

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