Smooth trajectory generation for rotating extensible manipulators

Smooth trajectory generation for rotating extensible manipulators In this study, the generation of smooth trajectories of the end effector of a rotating extensible manipulator arm is considered. Possible trajectories are modelled using Cartesian and polar piecewise cubic interpolants expressed as polynomial Hermite‐type functions. The use of polar piecewise cubic interpolants devises continuous first‐order and – in some cases – second‐order derivatives and allows easy calculation of kinematics variables such as velocity and acceleration. Moreover, the manipulator equations of motion can be easily handled, and the constrained trajectory of the non‐active end of the manipulator derived directly from the position of the end‐effector. To verify the proposed approach, numerical simulations are conducted for two different configurations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mathematical Methods in the Applied Sciences Wiley

Smooth trajectory generation for rotating extensible manipulators

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/smooth-trajectory-generation-for-rotating-extensible-manipulators-A9TKHLhdfB
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
ISSN
0170-4214
eISSN
1099-1476
D.O.I.
10.1002/mma.4210
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In this study, the generation of smooth trajectories of the end effector of a rotating extensible manipulator arm is considered. Possible trajectories are modelled using Cartesian and polar piecewise cubic interpolants expressed as polynomial Hermite‐type functions. The use of polar piecewise cubic interpolants devises continuous first‐order and – in some cases – second‐order derivatives and allows easy calculation of kinematics variables such as velocity and acceleration. Moreover, the manipulator equations of motion can be easily handled, and the constrained trajectory of the non‐active end of the manipulator derived directly from the position of the end‐effector. To verify the proposed approach, numerical simulations are conducted for two different configurations. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Journal

Mathematical Methods in the Applied SciencesWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off