Sleep patterns predictive of daytime challenging behavior in individuals with low‐functioning autism

Sleep patterns predictive of daytime challenging behavior in individuals with low‐functioning... IntroductionAutism spectrum disorder (or autism) is associated with a high prevalence of sleep and behavioral difficulties. Prior research indicates that 40–80% of individuals with autism experience problems with sleep [Allik, Larsson, & Smedje, ; Anders, Iosif, Schwichtenberg, Tang, & Goodlin‐Jones, ; Rzepecka, McKenzie, McClure, & Murphy, ] and 64–93% exhibit at least one challenging behavior (i.e., behaviors that are physically dangerous or impact learning; e.g., aggression, self‐injury, or tantrums) [Hattier, Matson, Belva, & Horovitz, ; Matson, Mahan, Hess, Fodstad, & Neal, ]. Although the association between sleep and behavior has been investigated in adults and individuals with high‐functioning autism [AlBacker & Bashir, ; Fadini et al., ; Goldman et al., ; Hirata et al., ; Hollaway, Aman, & Butter, ; Mayes & Calhoun, ; Mazurek & Sohl, ], these relationships are yet to be studied in individuals with low‐functioning autism (i.e., individuals with severe intellectual and social‐communication impairment) [Cohen, Conduit, Lockley, Rajaratnam, & Cornish, ]. Crucially, all previous research on the relationship between sleep and behavior (both in autism and other populations) has focused on the association between an individual's overall sleep quality and their overall incidence or severity of challenging behaviors. It therefore remains unclear whether these relationships http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Autism Research Wiley
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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
ISSN
1939-3792
eISSN
1939-3806
D.O.I.
10.1002/aur.1899
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionAutism spectrum disorder (or autism) is associated with a high prevalence of sleep and behavioral difficulties. Prior research indicates that 40–80% of individuals with autism experience problems with sleep [Allik, Larsson, & Smedje, ; Anders, Iosif, Schwichtenberg, Tang, & Goodlin‐Jones, ; Rzepecka, McKenzie, McClure, & Murphy, ] and 64–93% exhibit at least one challenging behavior (i.e., behaviors that are physically dangerous or impact learning; e.g., aggression, self‐injury, or tantrums) [Hattier, Matson, Belva, & Horovitz, ; Matson, Mahan, Hess, Fodstad, & Neal, ]. Although the association between sleep and behavior has been investigated in adults and individuals with high‐functioning autism [AlBacker & Bashir, ; Fadini et al., ; Goldman et al., ; Hirata et al., ; Hollaway, Aman, & Butter, ; Mayes & Calhoun, ; Mazurek & Sohl, ], these relationships are yet to be studied in individuals with low‐functioning autism (i.e., individuals with severe intellectual and social‐communication impairment) [Cohen, Conduit, Lockley, Rajaratnam, & Cornish, ]. Crucially, all previous research on the relationship between sleep and behavior (both in autism and other populations) has focused on the association between an individual's overall sleep quality and their overall incidence or severity of challenging behaviors. It therefore remains unclear whether these relationships

Journal

Autism ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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