Skin hydration, microrelief and greasiness of normal skin in Antarctica

Skin hydration, microrelief and greasiness of normal skin in Antarctica IntroductionLivingston Island is one of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean being part of the north‐west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. From 1988, Bulgaria organized and built a scientific research base there, working during the summer time. Livingston has a polar climate, and the Island weather is notoriously capricious. The temperatures are rather constant and seldom exceed 3 °C in Antarctic summer or fall below 20 °C in winter. The average relative humidity is 81.4%, and the average annual wind speed is 13.3 km/h.The environment directly can affect the skin in many ways, most of which tend to be detrimental. The negative influence of solar radiation as a primary cause of skin damage and photoageing is already well studied and documented. Extremes of temperature and humidity have an impact on skin. Cold, wintery weather conditions have been shown to encourage the development of dermatoses through damage to the skin barrier.We studied the changes in the skin hydration, greasiness and microrelief due to the extreme climatic environmental factors during the stay of the members of the Bulgarian Antarctic expedition.Material and methodsStudy population and protocolFifty‐nine Caucasian healthy subjects, 42 men and 17 women with mean age 50.9 years (27–68), http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & Venereology Wiley

Skin hydration, microrelief and greasiness of normal skin in Antarctica

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology
ISSN
0926-9959
eISSN
1468-3083
D.O.I.
10.1111/jdv.14482
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

IntroductionLivingston Island is one of the South Shetland Islands in the Southern Ocean being part of the north‐west coast of the Antarctic Peninsula. From 1988, Bulgaria organized and built a scientific research base there, working during the summer time. Livingston has a polar climate, and the Island weather is notoriously capricious. The temperatures are rather constant and seldom exceed 3 °C in Antarctic summer or fall below 20 °C in winter. The average relative humidity is 81.4%, and the average annual wind speed is 13.3 km/h.The environment directly can affect the skin in many ways, most of which tend to be detrimental. The negative influence of solar radiation as a primary cause of skin damage and photoageing is already well studied and documented. Extremes of temperature and humidity have an impact on skin. Cold, wintery weather conditions have been shown to encourage the development of dermatoses through damage to the skin barrier.We studied the changes in the skin hydration, greasiness and microrelief due to the extreme climatic environmental factors during the stay of the members of the Bulgarian Antarctic expedition.Material and methodsStudy population and protocolFifty‐nine Caucasian healthy subjects, 42 men and 17 women with mean age 50.9 years (27–68),

Journal

Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology & VenereologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

References

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