Skin Care in the Well Term Newborn: Two Systematic Reviews

Skin Care in the Well Term Newborn: Two Systematic Reviews ABSTRACT: Background: Awareness is increasing that the use of some commercial products on the premature neonatal skin may be beneficial, whereas the use of others may be harmful. The World Health Organization developed general postnatal care guidelines and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses published specific evidence‐based guidance relating to neonatal skin care. No systematic reviews on the topic have focused on the term newborn. The objective of this review was to determine, for the well term baby, if the use of soaps or detergents in bath water is associated with the development of dry, cracked, or flaking skin in the perinatal period, and short‐ and long‐term consequences of the use of emollients, lotions, or moisturizers for dry skin. Methods: We conducted a structured systematic review of prospective studies involving term newborns. Results: No relevant studies were located. Conclusions: No prospective studies of research in skin care involving the term newborn were found. Some recommendations for skin care may balance risk and benefit for the compromised infant, but this balance may be different for the healthy term newborn. Clinical practitioners should be aware that outcomes related to the use of soaps, detergents, emollients, and lotions on the term neonatal skin have not been formally investigated. Systematic reviews that yield no formal results provide insights into unresearched areas of practice, and should be reported to highlight these deficits, and to avoid duplication of effort by future investigators. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Birth Wiley

Skin Care in the Well Term Newborn: Two Systematic Reviews

Birth, Volume 32 (3) – Sep 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/skin-care-in-the-well-term-newborn-two-systematic-reviews-jAEHVcKSJw
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0730-7659
eISSN
1523-536X
DOI
10.1111/j.0730-7659.2005.00374.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT: Background: Awareness is increasing that the use of some commercial products on the premature neonatal skin may be beneficial, whereas the use of others may be harmful. The World Health Organization developed general postnatal care guidelines and the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses published specific evidence‐based guidance relating to neonatal skin care. No systematic reviews on the topic have focused on the term newborn. The objective of this review was to determine, for the well term baby, if the use of soaps or detergents in bath water is associated with the development of dry, cracked, or flaking skin in the perinatal period, and short‐ and long‐term consequences of the use of emollients, lotions, or moisturizers for dry skin. Methods: We conducted a structured systematic review of prospective studies involving term newborns. Results: No relevant studies were located. Conclusions: No prospective studies of research in skin care involving the term newborn were found. Some recommendations for skin care may balance risk and benefit for the compromised infant, but this balance may be different for the healthy term newborn. Clinical practitioners should be aware that outcomes related to the use of soaps, detergents, emollients, and lotions on the term neonatal skin have not been formally investigated. Systematic reviews that yield no formal results provide insights into unresearched areas of practice, and should be reported to highlight these deficits, and to avoid duplication of effort by future investigators.

Journal

BirthWiley

Published: Sep 1, 2005

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off