Single‐staged implant placement using bone ring technique with and without membrane placement: An experimental study in the Beagle dog

Single‐staged implant placement using bone ring technique with and without membrane placement:... INTRODUCTIONThe surgical procedures applied to vertically augment compromised alveolar ridges aim to create favorable conditions for implant placement (Aghaloo & Moy, ). In spite of the recent achievements in bone regeneration, the autogenous block bone grafting still remains the treatment of choice for vertically atrophic alveolar ridges (Chiapasco, Gatti & Gatti, ; Rocchietta, Fontana & Simion, ).The reasons for the use of autogenous bone in bone regeneration are its possible osteogenic capacity and its osteoconductivity (Miron et al., ). Furthermore, the cortical bone is known for its low resorption rate and consequently is stable enough to withstand load‐bearing forces (Smolka, Eggensperger, Carollo, Ozdoba & Iizuka, ). The cortical bone grafts are, however, characterized by the absence of viable bone cells and a reduced rate of revascularization (Enneking, Eady & Burchardt, ). Hence, a two‐staged implant placement is preferred due to an unpredictable rate of initial bone resorption (Roccuzzo, Ramieri, Bunino & Berrone, ) and possible resulting implant loss (Boronat, Carrillo, Penarrocha & Pennarocha, ).The bone ring technique was originally described as a concomitant, already osseointegrated implant placement transplanted together with the surrounding bone (Cannizzaro et al., ; Lazzara, ; Wang, Klein & Kaufman, ). The augmentation procedure was performed with an http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Clinical Oral Implants Research Wiley

Single‐staged implant placement using bone ring technique with and without membrane placement: An experimental study in the Beagle dog

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0905-7161
eISSN
1600-0501
D.O.I.
10.1111/clr.13111
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

INTRODUCTIONThe surgical procedures applied to vertically augment compromised alveolar ridges aim to create favorable conditions for implant placement (Aghaloo & Moy, ). In spite of the recent achievements in bone regeneration, the autogenous block bone grafting still remains the treatment of choice for vertically atrophic alveolar ridges (Chiapasco, Gatti & Gatti, ; Rocchietta, Fontana & Simion, ).The reasons for the use of autogenous bone in bone regeneration are its possible osteogenic capacity and its osteoconductivity (Miron et al., ). Furthermore, the cortical bone is known for its low resorption rate and consequently is stable enough to withstand load‐bearing forces (Smolka, Eggensperger, Carollo, Ozdoba & Iizuka, ). The cortical bone grafts are, however, characterized by the absence of viable bone cells and a reduced rate of revascularization (Enneking, Eady & Burchardt, ). Hence, a two‐staged implant placement is preferred due to an unpredictable rate of initial bone resorption (Roccuzzo, Ramieri, Bunino & Berrone, ) and possible resulting implant loss (Boronat, Carrillo, Penarrocha & Pennarocha, ).The bone ring technique was originally described as a concomitant, already osseointegrated implant placement transplanted together with the surrounding bone (Cannizzaro et al., ; Lazzara, ; Wang, Klein & Kaufman, ). The augmentation procedure was performed with an

Journal

Clinical Oral Implants ResearchWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ;

References

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