Simultaneous inbreeding and outbreeding depression in reintroduced Arabian oryx

Simultaneous inbreeding and outbreeding depression in reintroduced Arabian oryx In most species the offspring of closely related parents have reduced fitness compared with the offspring of unrelated parents, a phenomenon known as inbreeding depression. However if parents are very distantly related, their offspring may also have reduced fitness. This pattern, outbreeding depression, has been most commonly observed in plants and only rarely in animals. Here we examine the consequences of inbreeding and outbreeding on juvenile survival of reintroduced Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) in Oman, a population with a small number of founders drawn from a number of sources. Using microsatellite‐based measures of inbreeding and outbreeding, there was no apparent relationship between inbreeding or outbreeding and survival when inbreeding and outbreeding were tested in separate statistical models. However when inbreeding and outbreeding were tested in the same statistical model, we found simultaneous inbreeding depression and outbreeding depression acting on juvenile survival. Outbreeding depression may be more common in vertebrates than previously supposed, and conservation strategies that seek to maximize the genetic diversity of managed populations may risk mixing lineages that are sufficiently differentiated to cause outbreeding depression among descendants. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Animal Conservation Wiley

Simultaneous inbreeding and outbreeding depression in reintroduced Arabian oryx

Animal Conservation, Volume 3 (3) – Aug 1, 2000

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
"Copyright © 2000 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company"
ISSN
1367-9430
eISSN
1469-1795
DOI
10.1111/j.1469-1795.2000.tb00109.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

In most species the offspring of closely related parents have reduced fitness compared with the offspring of unrelated parents, a phenomenon known as inbreeding depression. However if parents are very distantly related, their offspring may also have reduced fitness. This pattern, outbreeding depression, has been most commonly observed in plants and only rarely in animals. Here we examine the consequences of inbreeding and outbreeding on juvenile survival of reintroduced Arabian oryx (Oryx leucoryx) in Oman, a population with a small number of founders drawn from a number of sources. Using microsatellite‐based measures of inbreeding and outbreeding, there was no apparent relationship between inbreeding or outbreeding and survival when inbreeding and outbreeding were tested in separate statistical models. However when inbreeding and outbreeding were tested in the same statistical model, we found simultaneous inbreeding depression and outbreeding depression acting on juvenile survival. Outbreeding depression may be more common in vertebrates than previously supposed, and conservation strategies that seek to maximize the genetic diversity of managed populations may risk mixing lineages that are sufficiently differentiated to cause outbreeding depression among descendants.

Journal

Animal ConservationWiley

Published: Aug 1, 2000

References

  • Inbreeding depression and its evolutionary consequences
    Charlesworth, D.; Charlesworth, B.
  • Introduction to quantitative genetics
    Falconer, D. S.; Mackay, T. F. C.
  • An experimental study of inbreeding depression in a natural habitat
    Jiménez, J. A.; Hughes, K. A.; Alaks, G.; Graham, L.; Lacy, R. C.
  • The natural history of inbreeding and outbreeding
    Lacy, R. C.; Petric, A.; Warneke, M.
  • Inbreeding and juvenile mortality in small populations of ungulates
    Ralls, K.; Brugger, K.; Ballou, J.

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