Simulation of self‐organization processes in filled rubber

Simulation of self‐organization processes in filled rubber A typical property of filled rubber material, known as Mullins effect, is that prestraining leads to a reduction of stresses at strain levels smaller than the maximum strain in the loading history. This softening is related to the direction of the prestrain and therefore induces a material anisotropy. The microstructural process responsible for this effect is still subject of discussion. Here, a mechanism based on the self‐organization of weak physical links is proposed. The central idea states that these links organize into a pattern of different linkage densities leading to the observed properties. The theory is tested by a simulation program. In the simulation, several typical rubber properties can be reproduced, while clearly observing self‐organization of the model elements. (© 2017 Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Proceedings in Applied Mathematics & Mechanics Wiley

Simulation of self‐organization processes in filled rubber

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Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Wiley Subscription Services
ISSN
1617-7061
eISSN
1617-7061
D.O.I.
10.1002/pamm.201710214
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A typical property of filled rubber material, known as Mullins effect, is that prestraining leads to a reduction of stresses at strain levels smaller than the maximum strain in the loading history. This softening is related to the direction of the prestrain and therefore induces a material anisotropy. The microstructural process responsible for this effect is still subject of discussion. Here, a mechanism based on the self‐organization of weak physical links is proposed. The central idea states that these links organize into a pattern of different linkage densities leading to the observed properties. The theory is tested by a simulation program. In the simulation, several typical rubber properties can be reproduced, while clearly observing self‐organization of the model elements. (© 2017 Wiley‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

Journal

Proceedings in Applied Mathematics & MechanicsWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2017

References

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