Simulated responses to hypothetical fundamental niches

Simulated responses to hypothetical fundamental niches Abstract. Two graphical models of plant competition, the ‘ghost of competition past’ and the ‘hierarchical’ model are compared using a greatly simplified individual‐based forest dynamics simulation. Assumed fundamental niche shapes are used to determine the basic growth responses of the species, but competition alters the realized niche. Differences in the two models, amount of niche overlap, disturbance, and removal and invasion of species are examined in simulation experiments. Without disturbance, the realized niche responses reveal abrupt boundaries between species in all cases, and thus the responses are generally platykurtic to rectangular with little overlap. In some cases overlap through the extension of abundance of weaker competitors into the area of greater resources — dominated by better competitors but still within their fundamental niche — creates skewed distributions, as have been observed and simulated in the past. When species are removed or invade, the abrupt boundaries and the lack of difference in final response shape indicate that past removals may be difficult to detect. This difficulty may be important because former species may be influencing the responses that are observed in common non‐equilibrium distributions. Even when assumptions favor the illustration of a competitive hierarchy, actual distributions and dynamics do not differentiate between it and a model of the ghost of competition past. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Vegetation Science Wiley

Simulated responses to hypothetical fundamental niches

Journal of Vegetation Science, Volume 8 (2) – Apr 1, 1997

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/simulated-responses-to-hypothetical-fundamental-niches-BhL18YwJCz
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
1997 IAVS ‐ the International Association of Vegetation Science
ISSN
1100-9233
eISSN
1654-1103
DOI
10.2307/3237360
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Abstract. Two graphical models of plant competition, the ‘ghost of competition past’ and the ‘hierarchical’ model are compared using a greatly simplified individual‐based forest dynamics simulation. Assumed fundamental niche shapes are used to determine the basic growth responses of the species, but competition alters the realized niche. Differences in the two models, amount of niche overlap, disturbance, and removal and invasion of species are examined in simulation experiments. Without disturbance, the realized niche responses reveal abrupt boundaries between species in all cases, and thus the responses are generally platykurtic to rectangular with little overlap. In some cases overlap through the extension of abundance of weaker competitors into the area of greater resources — dominated by better competitors but still within their fundamental niche — creates skewed distributions, as have been observed and simulated in the past. When species are removed or invade, the abrupt boundaries and the lack of difference in final response shape indicate that past removals may be difficult to detect. This difficulty may be important because former species may be influencing the responses that are observed in common non‐equilibrium distributions. Even when assumptions favor the illustration of a competitive hierarchy, actual distributions and dynamics do not differentiate between it and a model of the ghost of competition past.

Journal

Journal of Vegetation ScienceWiley

Published: Apr 1, 1997

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off