Simple scaling of photosynthesis from leaves to canopies without the errors of big‐leaf models

Simple scaling of photosynthesis from leaves to canopies without the errors of big‐leaf models ABSTRACT In big‐leaf models of canopy photosynthesis, the Rubisco activity per unit ground area is taken as the sum of activities per unit leaf area within the canopy, and electron transport capacity is similarly summed. Such models overestimate rates of photosynthesis and require empirical curvature factors in the response to irradiance. We show that, with any distribution of leaf nitrogen within the canopy (including optimal), the required curvature factors are not constant but vary with canopy leaf area index and leaf nitrogen content. We further show that the underlying reason is the difference between the time‐averaged and instantaneous distributions of absorbed irradiance, caused by penetration of sunflecks and the range of leaf angles in canopies. These errors are avoided in models that treat the canopy in terms of a number of layers – the multi‐layer models. We present an alternative to the multi‐layer model: by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaf fractions of the canopy, a single layered sun/shade model is obtained, which is as accurate and simpler. The model is a scaled version of a leaf model as distinct from an integrative approach. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Cell & Environment Wiley

Simple scaling of photosynthesis from leaves to canopies without the errors of big‐leaf models

Plant Cell & Environment, Volume 20 (5) – May 1, 1997

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0140-7791
eISSN
1365-3040
D.O.I.
10.1111/j.1365-3040.1997.00094.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

ABSTRACT In big‐leaf models of canopy photosynthesis, the Rubisco activity per unit ground area is taken as the sum of activities per unit leaf area within the canopy, and electron transport capacity is similarly summed. Such models overestimate rates of photosynthesis and require empirical curvature factors in the response to irradiance. We show that, with any distribution of leaf nitrogen within the canopy (including optimal), the required curvature factors are not constant but vary with canopy leaf area index and leaf nitrogen content. We further show that the underlying reason is the difference between the time‐averaged and instantaneous distributions of absorbed irradiance, caused by penetration of sunflecks and the range of leaf angles in canopies. These errors are avoided in models that treat the canopy in terms of a number of layers – the multi‐layer models. We present an alternative to the multi‐layer model: by separately integrating the sunlit and shaded leaf fractions of the canopy, a single layered sun/shade model is obtained, which is as accurate and simpler. The model is a scaled version of a leaf model as distinct from an integrative approach.

Journal

Plant Cell & EnvironmentWiley

Published: May 1, 1997

References

  • Patterns of light and nitrogen distribution in relation to whole canopy carbon gain in C 3 and C 4 mono‐ and dicotyledonous species
    Anten, Anten; Schieving, Schieving; Werger, Werger
  • Nitrogen and photosynthesis in the flag leaf of wheat ( Triticum aestivum L.)
    Evans, Evans
  • Allocating leaf nitrogen for the maximization of carbon gain: leaf age as a control on the allocation program
    Field, Field
  • A simple calibrated model of Amazon rainforest productivity based on leaf biochemical properties
    Lloyd, Lloyd; Grace, Grace; Miranda, Miranda; Meir, Meir; Wong, Wong; Miranda, Miranda; Wright, Wright; Gash, Gash; McIntyre, McIntyre
  • Vegetation‐atmosphere interaction and surface conductance at leaf, canopy and regional scales
    Raupach, Raupach
  • Light‐associated nitrogen distribution profile in flowering canopies of sunflower ( Helianthus annuus L.) altered during grain growth
    Sadras, Sadras; Hall, Hall; Connor, Connor
  • Comparative ecophysiology of leaf and canopy photosynthesis
    Terashima, Terashima; Hikosaka, Hikosaka
  • Inclined point quadrats
    Warren Wilson, Warren Wilson

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