Silique valves as sails in anemochory of Lunaria (Brassicaceae)

Silique valves as sails in anemochory of Lunaria (Brassicaceae) The generally held opinion that seeds of Lunaria remain at the replum after detachment of the two valves and then wind causes a shaking or rattling of the replum with its diaphragm, thus launching the seeds, is challenged. In a sparse forest in the Swabian Alb, the first author noticed flying valves of Lunaria rediviva to which the narrow‐winged flat seeds are attached. Investigations with SEM and histology have shown that the valves secrete a glue only at those sites where the seeds rest on the valves before valve tissues die. Further analysis has shown (using the periodic acid‐Schiff reaction) that the glue consists of polysaccharides. After detachment and dispersal of the valves, the adhesive strength continuously decreases. This is the first report for a sticky valve exudate in the Brassicaceae. Because of the adhesion of Lunaria seeds to their valves for some time, the 1st order diaspore is a mericarp, in a broad sense, and can be interpreted as an adaptation to long‐distance dispersal by stronger winds. In this context, the ‘flying carpets’ of Lunaria are more effective and transport more than one seed. Molecular studies assigned Lunaria to the tribe Biscutelleae, which now contains the angustiseptate genera Biscutella and Megadenia as well as the latiseptate genera Lunaria and Ricotia. The valves in Ricotia can easily be detached (studied in herbarium material and a living plant), but, in contrast to Lunaria, the ripe seeds remain at the replum and its diaphragm, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Biology Wiley

Silique valves as sails in anemochory of Lunaria (Brassicaceae)

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/silique-valves-as-sails-in-anemochory-of-lunaria-brassicaceae-SkDgJ6q0aO
Publisher
Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
Copyright
© 2018 German Botanical Society and Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands
ISSN
1435-8603
eISSN
1438-8677
D.O.I.
10.1111/plb.12659
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The generally held opinion that seeds of Lunaria remain at the replum after detachment of the two valves and then wind causes a shaking or rattling of the replum with its diaphragm, thus launching the seeds, is challenged. In a sparse forest in the Swabian Alb, the first author noticed flying valves of Lunaria rediviva to which the narrow‐winged flat seeds are attached. Investigations with SEM and histology have shown that the valves secrete a glue only at those sites where the seeds rest on the valves before valve tissues die. Further analysis has shown (using the periodic acid‐Schiff reaction) that the glue consists of polysaccharides. After detachment and dispersal of the valves, the adhesive strength continuously decreases. This is the first report for a sticky valve exudate in the Brassicaceae. Because of the adhesion of Lunaria seeds to their valves for some time, the 1st order diaspore is a mericarp, in a broad sense, and can be interpreted as an adaptation to long‐distance dispersal by stronger winds. In this context, the ‘flying carpets’ of Lunaria are more effective and transport more than one seed. Molecular studies assigned Lunaria to the tribe Biscutelleae, which now contains the angustiseptate genera Biscutella and Megadenia as well as the latiseptate genera Lunaria and Ricotia. The valves in Ricotia can easily be detached (studied in herbarium material and a living plant), but, in contrast to Lunaria, the ripe seeds remain at the replum and its diaphragm, respectively.

Journal

Plant BiologyWiley

Published: Jan 1, 2018

Keywords: ; ; ; ; ; ;

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed
Create lists to
organize your research
Export lists, citations
Read DeepDyve articles
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off