Shrinkage necrosis: A distinct mode of cellular death

Shrinkage necrosis: A distinct mode of cellular death PLATES I-VI SMALL round masses of acidophilic cytoplasm, often referred to as Councilman bodies, are found in the liver in a variety of pathological conditions (Child and Ruiz, 1968). Electron-microscope examination has shown them to be derived from condensed parenchymal cells (Klion and Schaffner, 1966), and, though their organelles usually appear ) structurally (Kerr, 1 9 6 9 ~and chemically (Kerr, 1965, 1967) well preserved, the small size of many of the bodies and the frequent absence of nuclei clearly indicate that their formation is an irreversible change, for which the term shrinkage necrosis has been suggested (Kerr, 1965). However, there is still uncertainty about the stage in the development of the bodies at which viability is lost (Klion and Schaffner; Kerr, 1969a), and little is known of their ultimate fate. Ligation of the portal vein branches supplying the left and median lobes of the rat liver is followed by marked atrophy of these lobes. If the veins are tied close to the liver, centrilobular coagulative necrosis occurs (Kerr, 1965), probably because spasm of hepatic artery branches, which lie close to the veins at this level, aggravates the ischaemia. But if the main venous trunk to the left http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Journal of Pathology Wiley

Shrinkage necrosis: A distinct mode of cellular death

The Journal of Pathology, Volume 105 (1) – Sep 1, 1971

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1971 The Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland
ISSN
0022-3417
eISSN
1096-9896
DOI
10.1002/path.1711050103
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

PLATES I-VI SMALL round masses of acidophilic cytoplasm, often referred to as Councilman bodies, are found in the liver in a variety of pathological conditions (Child and Ruiz, 1968). Electron-microscope examination has shown them to be derived from condensed parenchymal cells (Klion and Schaffner, 1966), and, though their organelles usually appear ) structurally (Kerr, 1 9 6 9 ~and chemically (Kerr, 1965, 1967) well preserved, the small size of many of the bodies and the frequent absence of nuclei clearly indicate that their formation is an irreversible change, for which the term shrinkage necrosis has been suggested (Kerr, 1965). However, there is still uncertainty about the stage in the development of the bodies at which viability is lost (Klion and Schaffner; Kerr, 1969a), and little is known of their ultimate fate. Ligation of the portal vein branches supplying the left and median lobes of the rat liver is followed by marked atrophy of these lobes. If the veins are tied close to the liver, centrilobular coagulative necrosis occurs (Kerr, 1965), probably because spasm of hepatic artery branches, which lie close to the veins at this level, aggravates the ischaemia. But if the main venous trunk to the left

Journal

The Journal of PathologyWiley

Published: Sep 1, 1971

References

  • Participation of lysosomes in cellular autophagy induced in rat liver by glucagon
    Deter, Deter; Baudhuin, Baudhuin; de Duve, de Duve
  • Lipofuscin (aging) pigment granules of the newborn human liver
    Goldfischer, Goldfischer; Bernstein, Bernstein
  • Liver cell defaecation: an electron‐microscope study of the discharge of lysosomal residual bodies into the intercellular space
    Kerr, Kerr

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