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Short intervals induce superior training adaptations compared with long intervals in cyclists – An effort‐matched approach

Short intervals induce superior training adaptations compared with long intervals in cyclists –... The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 10 weeks of effort‐matched short intervals (SI; n = 9) or long intervals (LI; n = 7) in cyclists. The high‐intensity interval sessions (HIT) were performed twice a week interspersed with low‐intensity training. There were no differences between groups at pretest. There were no differences between groups in total volume of both HIT and low‐intensity training. The SI group achieved a larger relative improvement in VO2max than the LI group (8.7% ± 5.0% vs 2.6% ± 5.2%), respectively, P ≤ 0.05). Mean effect size (ES) of the relative improvement in all measured parameters, including performance measured as mean power output during 30‐s all‐out, 5‐min all‐out, and 40‐min all‐out tests revealed a moderate‐to‐large effect of SI training vs LI training (ES range was 0.86–1.54). These results suggest that the present SI protocol induces superior training adaptations on both the high‐power region and lower power region of cyclists' power profile compared with the present LI protocol. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in Sports Wiley

Short intervals induce superior training adaptations compared with long intervals in cyclists – An effort‐matched approach

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd
ISSN
0905-7188
eISSN
1600-0838
DOI
10.1111/sms.12165
pmid
24382021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 10 weeks of effort‐matched short intervals (SI; n = 9) or long intervals (LI; n = 7) in cyclists. The high‐intensity interval sessions (HIT) were performed twice a week interspersed with low‐intensity training. There were no differences between groups at pretest. There were no differences between groups in total volume of both HIT and low‐intensity training. The SI group achieved a larger relative improvement in VO2max than the LI group (8.7% ± 5.0% vs 2.6% ± 5.2%), respectively, P ≤ 0.05). Mean effect size (ES) of the relative improvement in all measured parameters, including performance measured as mean power output during 30‐s all‐out, 5‐min all‐out, and 40‐min all‐out tests revealed a moderate‐to‐large effect of SI training vs LI training (ES range was 0.86–1.54). These results suggest that the present SI protocol induces superior training adaptations on both the high‐power region and lower power region of cyclists' power profile compared with the present LI protocol.

Journal

Scandinavian Journal of Medicine & Science in SportsWiley

Published: Apr 1, 2015

References