Sex steroid receptors in normal and hyperplastic human prostate

Sex steroid receptors in normal and hyperplastic human prostate The concentrations of sex steroid receptors (per unit DNA) were measured in normal periurethral and peripheral prostatic tissue samples from seven men (mean age 64 years; range 54–71 years) undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer, and in hyperplastic nodules from 15 men with BPH (mean age 69 years; range 60–89). Occupied androgen (AR) and estrogen (ER) receptors were measured with an improved exchange procedure, where receptor‐binding sites were stabilized by a combinatorial procedure involving (1) careful washout of extracellular secretory products (including proteases) prior to homogenization, (2) inclusion of 0.5 mM phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride (PMSF) and 20 mM molybdate in the exchange medium, and (3) long‐term incubation at 0–4°C. Bound radioligands were separated by a hydroxylapatite (HAP) batch adsorption procedure. Maximal specific exchange binding of 3H‐R 1881 or 3H‐estradiol in total homogenates of human prostate samples was achieved after incubation periods of about 72 hat 0–4°C. In contrast, progestin receptors (PR) were readily available for binding 3H‐R 5020; thus overnight binding at 0–4°C was routinely used to measure PR. Binding specificities and equilibrium binding constants (calculated from 8‐point Scatchard plots, correcting for nonsaturable binding) were found to be characteristic for AR, PR, and ER, respectively. The receptor results obtained in this study demonstrate that (1) no significant differences existed in total AR per unit DNA between hyperplastic and either central or peripheral prostatic tissue samples; (2) PR was present in both zones of normal prostatic tissue as often as in BPH samples, with PR concentrations significantly lower in hyperplastic samples; and (3) ER was irregularly detected in both normal and hyperplastic tissue in low concentration relative to AR and PR; the frequency of ER detection was much lower in BPH than in normal prostate tissue. Studies of steroid receptor content relative to enzyme markers specific for epithelial and stromal cells in BPH samples showed a positive correlation between acid phosphatase activity (a specific marker for epithelial cells) and both AR and PR. No correlation was observed between AR or PR with either prolyl hydroxylase or myosin ATPase (specific markers for stromal cells). These observations suggest that PR, as well as AR, is primarily associated with the epithelial elements of prostate. Because of the relative infrequency of ER, similar correlation of ER with enzyme markers was not possible. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The Prostate Wiley

Sex steroid receptors in normal and hyperplastic human prostate

Loading next page...
 
/lp/wiley/sex-steroid-receptors-in-normal-and-hyperplastic-human-prostate-bVv6oltWEJ
Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1985 Wiley‐Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0270-4137
eISSN
1097-0045
DOI
10.1002/pros.2990060305
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The concentrations of sex steroid receptors (per unit DNA) were measured in normal periurethral and peripheral prostatic tissue samples from seven men (mean age 64 years; range 54–71 years) undergoing cystectomy for bladder cancer, and in hyperplastic nodules from 15 men with BPH (mean age 69 years; range 60–89). Occupied androgen (AR) and estrogen (ER) receptors were measured with an improved exchange procedure, where receptor‐binding sites were stabilized by a combinatorial procedure involving (1) careful washout of extracellular secretory products (including proteases) prior to homogenization, (2) inclusion of 0.5 mM phenylmethyl sulfonylfluoride (PMSF) and 20 mM molybdate in the exchange medium, and (3) long‐term incubation at 0–4°C. Bound radioligands were separated by a hydroxylapatite (HAP) batch adsorption procedure. Maximal specific exchange binding of 3H‐R 1881 or 3H‐estradiol in total homogenates of human prostate samples was achieved after incubation periods of about 72 hat 0–4°C. In contrast, progestin receptors (PR) were readily available for binding 3H‐R 5020; thus overnight binding at 0–4°C was routinely used to measure PR. Binding specificities and equilibrium binding constants (calculated from 8‐point Scatchard plots, correcting for nonsaturable binding) were found to be characteristic for AR, PR, and ER, respectively. The receptor results obtained in this study demonstrate that (1) no significant differences existed in total AR per unit DNA between hyperplastic and either central or peripheral prostatic tissue samples; (2) PR was present in both zones of normal prostatic tissue as often as in BPH samples, with PR concentrations significantly lower in hyperplastic samples; and (3) ER was irregularly detected in both normal and hyperplastic tissue in low concentration relative to AR and PR; the frequency of ER detection was much lower in BPH than in normal prostate tissue. Studies of steroid receptor content relative to enzyme markers specific for epithelial and stromal cells in BPH samples showed a positive correlation between acid phosphatase activity (a specific marker for epithelial cells) and both AR and PR. No correlation was observed between AR or PR with either prolyl hydroxylase or myosin ATPase (specific markers for stromal cells). These observations suggest that PR, as well as AR, is primarily associated with the epithelial elements of prostate. Because of the relative infrequency of ER, similar correlation of ER with enzyme markers was not possible.

Journal

The ProstateWiley

Published: Jan 1, 1985

References

  • Characteristics of separated epithelial and stromal subfractions of prostate. II. Human prostate
    Robel, Robel; Eychenne, Eychenne; Blondeau, Blondeau; Picard‐Groyer, Picard‐Groyer; Baulieu, Baulieu; Bruner‐Lorand, Bruner‐Lorand; Hechter, Hechter
  • Characteristics of separated epithelial and stromal subfractions of prostate. I. Rat ventral prostate
    Bruner‐Lorand, Bruner‐Lorand; Mechaber, Mechaber; Zwick, Zwick; Hechter, Hechter; Eychenne, Eychenne; Baulieu, Baulieu; Robel, Robel

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off