Sex of candidate and sex of interviewer as determinants of self‐presentation orientation in interviews an experimental study

Sex of candidate and sex of interviewer as determinants of self‐presentation orientation in... A number of writers and researchers on the selection interview have pointed out that the candidate is not a passive element in the situation and that he or she can play a considerable part in actively determining the course and outcome of the interview (e.g. Keenan, 1978, 1980; Higham, 1979). One line of enquiry in this context has been followed by Dipboye and Wiley (1977, 1978) in studies on candidate self-presentation styles. They found that a moderately aggressive style was evaluated more positively for a supervisory position than was a passive style, irrespective of the candidate’s sex. In a small exploratory study, Fletcher (1981) reported that female candidates had a preference for a more open and honest approach in interviews than did males, and that they also tended to opt for a less aggressive style of self-presentation, Putting these findings together, it seems possible that if females genuinely do prefer to take a less assertive attitude in interviews compared to males, it would work against their chances of success in selection for managerial positions. One purpose of the present investigation was to test more thoroughly the hypothesis that males and females favour different selfpresentation styles in interviews, in http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Applied Psychology Wiley

Sex of candidate and sex of interviewer as determinants of self‐presentation orientation in interviews an experimental study

Applied Psychology, Volume 33 (3) – Jul 1, 1984

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Publisher
Wiley
Copyright
Copyright © 1984 Wiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
ISSN
0269-994X
eISSN
1464-0597
DOI
10.1111/j.1464-0597.1984.tb01437.x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A number of writers and researchers on the selection interview have pointed out that the candidate is not a passive element in the situation and that he or she can play a considerable part in actively determining the course and outcome of the interview (e.g. Keenan, 1978, 1980; Higham, 1979). One line of enquiry in this context has been followed by Dipboye and Wiley (1977, 1978) in studies on candidate self-presentation styles. They found that a moderately aggressive style was evaluated more positively for a supervisory position than was a passive style, irrespective of the candidate’s sex. In a small exploratory study, Fletcher (1981) reported that female candidates had a preference for a more open and honest approach in interviews than did males, and that they also tended to opt for a less aggressive style of self-presentation, Putting these findings together, it seems possible that if females genuinely do prefer to take a less assertive attitude in interviews compared to males, it would work against their chances of success in selection for managerial positions. One purpose of the present investigation was to test more thoroughly the hypothesis that males and females favour different selfpresentation styles in interviews, in

Journal

Applied PsychologyWiley

Published: Jul 1, 1984

References

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